lunes, 3 de noviembre de 2014

Chris Weller - Chris Weller's Hanging Hearts (2014)




For a saxophonist the holy grail is the overall sound or tone, that feeling of concise wordless communication that can compress a lifetime into a solo or even a measure. Of course technique is important but it plays a supporting role and can only improve incrementally on what is there naturally. When asked about players that he feels a connection to Chicago born saxophonist, bandleader and composer Chris Weller couched his reply in similar terms. The players he highlighted were couched in terms of their overall individual sound, maybe mentioning specific configurations (e.g. Joe Lovano with Paul Motian) and occasionally even highlighting individual notes—for example John Coltrane's opening note on "Dedicated to You" (with Johnny Hartman).

It is this primacy of the overall 'feel' of a piece that is most important to him and which he and his band give plenty of evidence of on the six tracks of this enjoyable self-produced debut CD. In part this comes from the strong personal connection between the band members: Weller and keyboard player Cole DeGenova grew up together in Chicago, being joined by drummer Devin Drobka while they all studied at Berklee. The strong musical connection between the trio, and the ease with which Weller felt he could write for them, led to their deciding to explore this music more seriously and, ultimately, this album.

Fine opener "D Rover" gets things off to a lively start, Weller's sax having that visceral quality of the likes of Mats Gustafsson  powering the piece forward. Had there been bass on this track it might have overwhelmed, but the temptation to 'turn things up to eleven' was admirably resisted. This is a very difficult balance to strike -Neneh Cherry & the Thing managed it in their classic 2012 collaboration, tempering the latter's power and instrumental pyrotechnics without lessening the overall impact. Here Weller and the band ease the material into a free-er space, but naturally bring the theme back just at the point when it feels like the momentum might be lost.

But this is far from being a simple blowing date, second track Duke Ellington's "The Single Petal of a Rose" being about as great a contrast from the opener as it is possible to get. It is however, extremely effective in its use of simple straight ahead tender tenor sax over a modulated keyboard effect, the combination being another album highlight. Somewhere between these two extremes is another favourite, album closer "Confucius Says." Here Weller's sax and DeGenova's keyboard weave around Drobka's fantastically complex percussion work to great effect.

The eclectism of the collection is a strength, reinforced by the musical openness of the band. Weller is right to emphasise that improvisation is possible across all genres, tellingly citing jazz standards, Eric Satie and Dvorak alongside the Black Keys as potential sources when asked about the band's professed tendency to improvise around popular songs live. Of course you need the talent to back this up and the CD works because the feel and the musicianship are there.  Read more...



1. D Rover 08:14
2. The Single Petal of a Rose 04:40
3. Doo-Wop 08:53
4. Early Bird 06:50
5. Lucid Dream 05:16
6. Confucius Says 04:33





"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 

MoFrancesco Quintetto - Piedra Solar (2014)




The project was born at the end of the academic year 2010/11 of the degree in Jazz Music at ESML, Escola Superior de Musica de Lisboa. On the occasion of the last recital of Francesco Valente, on 28/06/11, this quintet has emerged that exhibited with original compositions. Following training began acting in Lisbon in several places where there is a weekly Jazz agenda, and began to act also outside this context (Italian Film Festival, Volvo Ocean Race, Universidade Nova with David Murray, Quinta da Regaleira Jazz, Douro Jazz Festival etc.). In this past year the quintet have recorded his first album “Maloca”, wich it was released by Art of Life Records, and the second album "Piedra Solar" released by Sintoma Records.

The Quintet proposes a modern jazz and fusion music with Mediterranean and Iberian classic and traditional music. The aim is to join the universal language of jazz music and an array improvisative original arrangements and also expressing the essence of the music from the land of origin of the musicians, in particular different styles and sounds of the Mediterranean.

“Piedra Solar is an homage to the Iberian peninsula. It contains original compositions, arrangements of anonymous pieces of classical andalusian music, and contemporary pieces like those of Catalan pianist and composer Federico Mompou, all arranged by members of the group. Anonymous poetic texts from the Al-Andalusian period, like those of Federico Garcia Lorca are interpreted and highlighted, and inspiration from imagery presented in José Saramago’s book ‘The Stone Raft’ (1986) is emphasized. An Iberian imagery which is converted into live music, presented in the key of Jazz in which the musicians arrangement and improvisation are fundamental. All in all, it’s a little homage to ‘Olisipo’, the city of Lisbon, where this album was conceived and recorded.




The Line-up is:

Guto Lucena (Tenor and soprano Sax, Bass Clarinet) and/or João Capinha (Tenor sax & flute)
Johannes Krieger (Trumpet) 
Iuri Gaspar (Piano) 
Miguel Moreira (Drums)
Francesco Valente (Double Bass)

Special Guests:

Aline Frazao: Voice
Marcos Suzano: Pandeiro
Jaco Loredo: Voice


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 




GAB

Mehmet Ali Sanlikol - What’s Next? (2014)



After listing the personnel (which varies on every track) for Turkish-born composer Mehmet Ali Sanlikol's new CD, What's Next?, there's scarcely room for a review. Well, perhaps a small one, starting with the fact that Sanlikol, a graduate of the Berklee School of Music and New England Conservatory, first studied classical piano with his mother, Fethiye Sanlikol, and by age five was presenting public recitals in his homeland. After further studies, with Turkish composer / jazz pianist Aydin Esen (to whom the album is dedicated), he earned a scholarship to Berklee and co-founded the electric band AudioFact, with whom he recorded two albums, in 1998 and 2003. More recently, Sanlikol helped found and is president of Dunya, a musicians' collective that "explores a cosmopolitan view of the world through the lens of a wide range of Turkish traditions . . ."

What's Next?, Sanlikol writes, was "more than a decade in the making," and indeed eight of its nine pieces were written during the years 1996-2000 (the exception is "Palindrome," commissioned by the American Islamic Congress in 2011). Even though Sanlikol draws on his Turkish heritage to underscore his essentially pleasing themes, the over-all complexion is one of American big-band jazz, well-written and expertly performed by Sanlikol and his colleagues. Certainly that is the case with the dynamic title track, which sounds much like the sort of unbridled flag-waver that would have been quite at home in the libraries of Herman, Basie, Rich or other big-band pacesetters. Even so, the Turkish influence is perceptible, as on "On the Edge of the Impossible," which combines American blues with "the Saba makam shared by Turkish and Arabic music"—not to mention the impact of one of Sanlikol's mentors, the late Bob Brookmeyer.

Another blues, suitably titled "The Blue Soul of Turkoromero," is leavened by Turkish folk music and the ney, which Sanlikol says is "an end-blown flute," and on which he solos. A wordless vocal and expansive piano solo (by Sanlikol) are prominent on the placid "Violet Longing," a warm bow to Esen's tutelage. While the plain-spoken "Kozan March" is derived from Turkish folk music, its rhythmic and harmonic framework is clearly based on the standard jazz idiom. Sanlikol uses a Moog synthesizer to deepen the shadowy spirit on the ballad "N.O.H.A," which precedes the pulsating finale, "Gone Crazy: A Noir Fantasy," dedicated to Hollywood films of that singular genre. Soloists on every number are unlisted, which is fine, as none rises above the ordinary. On the other hand, everyone is steadfastly bound to Sanlikol's perspective, and the ensemble bends to it task without respite. This is classic American-bred jazz with a slight Turkish accent, bold and refreshing in its own way and well worth hearing.



Mehmet Ali Sanlikol: composer, arranger, conductor, piano, keyboards, voice

1. What’s Next?
2. Better Stay Home
3. A Violet Longing
4. Palindrome
5. On the Edge of the Extreme Possible
6. The Blue Soul of Turkoromero
7. Kozan March
8. N.O.H.A.
9. Gone Crazy: A Noir Fantasy

Track 1 — Mike Peipman: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Jeff Claassen: trumpet; Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Sam Mehr: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Tucker Antell: tenor sax; Jared Sims: baritone sax; Clayton Dewalt: trombone; Randy Pingrey: trombone; Tim Lienhard: trombone; Ido Meshulam: bass trombone; Utar Artun: piano; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Bertram Lehmann: drums

Track 2 — Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Kathy Olson: baritone sax; Chris Gagne: trombone; Mehmet Sanlikol: piano, keyboards, voice; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Engin Gunaydin: drums

Track 3 — Jerry Sabatini: trumpet, flugelhorn; Sam Dechenne: trumpet, flugelhorn; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Kathy Olson: baritone sax; Chris Gagne: trombone; Mehmet Sanlikol: piano, keyboards, voice; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Cem Mutlu: drums; Engin Gunaydin: percussion

Track 4 — Mehmet Sanlikol: keyboards; Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: clarinet, alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Kathy Olson: bass clarinet, baritone sax; Chris Gagne: trombone; Lefteris Kordis: piano; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Cem Mutlu: drums; Bertram Lehmann: nekkare; Engin Gunaydin: kos

Track 5 — Mike Peipman: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Jeff Claassen: trumpet; Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: flute, alto sax; Sam Mehr; flute, alto sax; Aaron Henry: clarinet, tenor sax; Tucker Antell: clarinet, tenor sax; Jared Sims: bass clarinet, baritone sax; Clayton De Walt: trombone; Randy Pingrey: trombone; Tim Lienhard: trombone; Ido Meshulam: bass trombone; Utar Artun: piano; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Bertram Lehmann: drums

Track 6 — Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Kathy Olson: baritone sax; Chris Gagne: trombone; Mehmet Sanlikol: Fender Rhodes, keyboards, drum programming; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Engin Gunaydin: drums

Track 7 — Mike Peipman: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Jeff Claassen: trumpet; Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Sam Mehr: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax, clarinet; Tucker Antell: tenor sax; Jared Sims: baritone sax; Clayton De Walt: trombone; Randy Pingrey: trombone; Tin Lienhard: trombone; Mehmet Sanlikol: piano; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Bertram Lehmann: drums

Track 8 — Mike Peipman: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet, flugelhorn; Jeff Claassen: trumpet, flugelhorn; Jerry Sabatini: trumpet, flugelhorn; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Sam Mehr: flute, alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Tucker Antell: tenor sax; Jared Sims: baritone sax; Clayton De Walt: trombone; Randy Pingrey: trombone; Tim Lienhard: trombone; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Mehmet Sanlikol: piano, Moog synthesizer; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Bertram Lehmann: drums

Track 9 — Jerry Sabatini: trumpet; Sam Dechenne: trumpet; Mark Zaleski: alto sax; Aaron Henry: tenor sax; Kathy Olson: baritone sax; Chris Gagne: trombone; Phil Sargent: electric guitar; Fernando Huergo: electric bass; Cem Mutlu: drums; Bertram Lehmann: congas, djembe; Engin Gunaydin: percussion

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

Walter White - Most Triumphant (2014)


''…furiously intense, risk-laden, harmonically astute, rhythmically free, rolling passion tempering a sharp intellect…'' -Detroit Free Press

'Most Triumphant' is the long-anticipated debut recording of world renowned jazz trumpeter,Walter White, in a small group setting. Walter has previously released an eleven-piece ensemble, which has received much critical acclaim internationally. 'Most Triumphant', features five of Walter's original compositions plus new interpretations and adaptations from the jazz and classical repertoire.

Walter’s expressive trumpet-playing led him to collaborate with many of the top names in music including: Bob James, Dave Holland, the Mingus Big Band, the Woody Herman Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Gunther Schuller, the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, The Jaco Pastorius Big Band, and Arturo Sandoval.

Walter's playing has enhanced the sound tracks of records, movies, and television, including network sitcoms, TAXI and The Cosby Show. As a recording studio owner, Walter produces music for records, television, and film. In 1994, Walter produced the Walter White Long-tone Accompaniment, a play-along CD for music practice, now in its third printing.

Walter White, trumpet
Gary Schunk, piano
Miles Brown, bass
Sean Dobbins, drums

01. Spring Ahead
02. W.E.B.S.
03. Indiana
04. Most Triumphant
05. Joy
06. Ballade No. 1
07. The Beehive
08. Walt's Waltz
09. Bye, Bye, Blackbird
10. Prelude in E. Minor, Op. 28 No. 4

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

Dan Perantoni: Dan Perantoni plays Jazz Tuba featuring The Aha! Trio and Special Guests - Portrait in Black and White (2014)


Tuba artist, teacher, pedagogue, and solo recitalist, Daniel Perantoni is an innovator in a variety of genres including chamber music and jazz. He has appeared as the featured artist at Carnegie Hall, the Monterey Jazz Festival, the Spoleto Festival U.S.A., the Adelaide Festival in Australia, the Banff Centre for the Arts in Canada, the Montreux Brass Congress in Switzerland, and recently as a soloist throughout Japan.

Mr. Perantoni was a founding member of Summit Brass, a member of Symphonia, the Saint Louis Brass Quintet, and the Matteson-Phillips Tubajazz Consort. He has produced numerous solo and chamber music CDs. Along with Robert Tucci, Mr. Perantoni designed the "Perantucci" line of low brass instruments and mouthpieces.

Mr. Perantoni serves as the vice president for educational matters and consultant/clinician for Custom Music Company. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the executive board of T.U.B.A. His students hold prestigious positions in major performing ensembles and music schools around the world.

Portrait in Black and White - Dan Perantoni featuring the Aha! Trio and Special Guests

Perantoni's performance world is one of perfection and never missing a note – which explains in part, his hesitation to get out of his comfort zone and record a jazz CD. The jazz mentality is a bit looser and more forgiving as it’s spontaneous. Well, the results were exceptional!! 

‘‘Tricrocism’‘ – This is a jazz classic with a tricky, left-handed melody. Dan and the guys navigate it perfectly and he plays a swinging, solo right out of the box. 

‘‘Days of Wine and Roses’‘ features a great melodic duo by Jeremy and Dan, followed by inspired solos by Pat and Dan. Jeremy takes a wonderful bass solo and then we bring it home. 

‘‘She’s Real’‘ is Dan’s tribute to his wonderful wife (and great cook) Judy. Dan’s beautiful treatment of the melody followed by his solo speaks volumes. 

‘‘All of Me’‘ starts with Dan and Steve Houghton (drums) playing as a duo. Dan has such a great feel for the melody while providing a fat groove. Dan launches into a wonderful ‘walking bass line’‘ supporting the first part of Pat’s solo, going back to his Dixieland roots. 

‘‘Blues For DP’‘ - composed for Dan by NEA Jazz Master David Baker. This track starts with Dan playing an intro by himself utilizing his incredible technique, perfect time feel, and multi-phonics, finally setting up the band with a funky vamp. 

‘‘Portrait in Black and White’‘ opens with Dan and Steve playing the beautifully haunting melody. The band joins in later for a lush, bossa nova treatment of this special work. 

‘‘Don’t Get Around Much Anymore’‘ swings from start to finish! 

‘‘Can’t Go Home Again’‘ is a beautiful ballad that the great Chet Baker helped make famous. Dan again shows that he can play a melody like no other. Steve Allee plays a wonderfully sensitive solo as well. 

‘‘All The Things You Are’‘ receives a fresh Latin treatment by Allee.


Daniel Perantoni (tuba)
Tom Walsh (saxophone)
Pat Harbison (trumpet)
Steve Allee (piano)
Steve Houghton (drums)

1. Tricrotism (Oscar Pettiford)
2. Days of Wine and Roses (Henry Mancini)
3. She Is Real (Dan Perantoni)
4. All Of Me (Marks & Simons)
5. Blues for D.P. (David Baker)
6. Portrait in Black and White (Antonio Carlos Jobim)
7. Don't Get Around Much Anymore (Duke Ellington)
8. You Can't Go Home Again  (Don Sebesky)
9. All the Things You Are (Jerome Kern)

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi