lunes, 26 de septiembre de 2016

Ricardo Grilli - 1954 (October 7, 2016) TONE ROGUE RECORDS



Brazilian-born guitarist/composer Ricardo Grilli explores personal, musical and cosmic history on 1954, out October 7 on Tone Rogue Records

Grilli’s entrancing second album features the stellar line-up of pianist Aaron Parks, bassist Joe Martin and drummer Eric Harland

“Evocative, ethereal, and eclectic… Grilli [hits] that sweet spot somewhere between post bop and the avant garde.” – Critical Jazz

“Excellent... Can't stop listening.” – Steve Greenlee, JazzTimes



The title of 1954 (due out October 7 via Tone Rogue Records) comes from the year in which Grilli’s father was born – one possible beginning point for his own story. It also falls at the dawning of the Space Age, a time when people were looking optimistically forward to a future full of innovation and exploration. Significantly for the music contained within, it was also a time when jazz - bebop in particular - was thriving in Grilli’s adopted home of New York City, ghosts of which he can’t help but encounter as he walks through the city today.

“It gets a little mystical as you imagine it in your head how things were back then,” Grilli says. “I wonder if those musicians ever thought that the music they were shaping would evolve to become the way it is now. The concepts we use in today’s jazz still very much use the format of the bebop and hard bop era, even though they have more modern harmonies and meters.”

No matter how much he engages in a dialogue with the past, Grilli’s music is decidedly of the moment, replete with sleek, captivating melodies over tense, balance-challenging rhythms, combined in intricate but emotionally engaging structures. His compositions reveal the influence of modern masters like Kurt Rosenwinkel and Mark Turner alongside adventurous pop experimentalists like Radiohead and Sigur Ros, with a relaxed but expressive melodicism imbued by a youth spent absorbing the tropical sounds of Jobim and Elis Regina.

Grilli’s 2013 debut, If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler, captured the guitarist in a transitional moment. It documented not only his move from Brazil to Boston and then New York, but also his emergence onto the jazz scene after graduating from Berklee College of Music. Having picked up the guitar for the first time at the relatively advanced age of 20 and starting school at 23, five years later than most of his classmates, he recorded the album feeling like an underdog facing an uphill struggle.

That notion is left behind on 1954, which finds a more mature, self-assured Grilli in sophisticated communication with some of modern jazz’s most renowned musicians. “For the longest time I felt like I had missed the start of the race and had to catch up to the competition,” he says. “However, I have been very lucky to be able to play with so many of my heroes, and this record is, hopefully, a statement of my acceptance of my own playing and thinking myself worthy of playing with the musicians on it.”


Long fascinated with astronomy and the cosmos (Stephen Hawking sits on his bookshelf beside the likes of Italo Calvino, the surrealist author who lent both If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler and the current album’s “Vertigo” their titles), Grilli weaves interstellar concepts throughout the tunes on 1954. Opening track “Arcturus” is named for the brightest star in the eastern celestial hemisphere, its gradual build in intensity (thanks to Harland’s subtly insistent rhythms) suggesting the massive star’s gravitational pull. 

“Cosmonauts,” meanwhile, was inspired by the story of “phantom cosmonauts,” an unconfirmed theory suggesting that Yuri Gagarin’s successful flight may have been preceded by other ill-fated attempts.

“It’s a terrifying story,” Grilli says. “I imagined the fear of going into the unknown and not coming back. Jazz has a bit of that feeling, but not in the deadly sense. So I wanted to write an eerie, sad song, something a little somber, dark and mysterious.”


That combination of the cosmic and the intimate is echoed throughout 1954. Especially poignant is the lovely, ethereal “Rings,” which suggests the celestial rings surrounding Saturn and other planets as well as being a musical analog for the rings that symbolize union between people. The simmering, atmospheric “Radiance,” partially inspired by Brian Blade’s soulful Fellowship Band, evokes the far-off glow of heavenly bodies while pondering the loss of loved ones. “Breathe,” essentially a cha cha cha with modern contours, provides a respite from the frantic “Arcturus,” replicating the moment that a shuddering spacecraft breaks through the atmosphere into weightlessness.

Grilli also pays homage to some of his peers and mentors on 1954. “Pogo56” was written for trumpeter and Berklee professor Jason Palmer, while “Far Away Shores” is an homage to pianist Julian Shore, a close friend and collaborator. The album closes with “Pulse,” a final word on the idea of looking backward to look forward: a modernist bop tune that swings hard over contemporary harmonic movement.




Jakob Bro, Thomas Morgan & Joey Baron - Streams (2016) ECM



On his second leader album for ECM – following on from the prizewinning Gefion - Danish guitarist Jakob Bro continues to refine his trio project, with its emphases on melody, sound, space, layered textures and interaction. The rapport between Bro and Thomas Morgan (Bro calls him “my musical soul mate”) has become something extraordinary, and often guitarist and bassist develop improvisational ideas in parallel. There’s an historical aptness, too, in the choice of Joey Baron as the band’s new drummer, for Bro first encountered Morgan when the bassist was playing in Baron’s band a decade ago… On Streams Joey Baron dives into the music’s detail with obvious pleasure. This recording features five new Bro pieces: “Opal”, “Full Moon Europa”, “Shell Pink”, “Sisimiut” and “Heroines” (heard in both a trio version and a particularly lovely solo version). Completing the album’s repertoire is the freely improvised “PM Dream”, dedicated to the late Paul Motian. Jakob’s approach to melody acknowledges the influence of Motian, and both Bro and Morgan played in the late drummer’s ensembles . 

Recorded at Studios La Buissonne in the South of France in November 2015 and produced by Manfred Eicher, Streams is issued on the eve of a major tour by the Bro-Morgan-Baron trio with dates in Denmark, the Netherlands, Slovakia, Belgium, Poland, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Ukraine and South Korea.


01. Opal 4:40
02. Heroines 5:35
03. Pm Dream 9:37
04. Full Moon Europa 10:19
05. Shell Pink 8:17
06. Heroines (Solo) 2:33
07. Sisimiut 7:30

Jakob Bro: guitar
Thomas Morgan: double bass
Joey Baron: drums