jueves, 18 de diciembre de 2014

Tomás Doncker Band - Big Apple Blues (2014)



Close on the heels of his first full-length album, a tribute to Howlin' Wolf, guitarist Tomás Doncker Band released his second collaboration with Pulitzer prize winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa, Big Apple Blues (True Groove 2014), on October 21. Their first collaboration, The Mercy Suite (Future Roots Music 2009), featured the likes of MeShell NdegeOcello among others. Their latest effort features original music by Doncker and his band as well as an interesting blend of lighthearted bluesy tunes alongside more thought-provoking cuts that effectively showcase Komunyakaa's legendary talents.

The album begins with a bang; the introduction to "Big Apple Blues" belies how mellow the song itself is, but the staggering energy sets the tone for the conviction and gutsiness of the band's vibe. The atmosphere here is classic blues with a little more depth, both from Doncker's subtle songwriting flourishes and Komunyakaa's colorful lyrics. "A New Day" has a similar musical energy. It's medium slow tempo and impassioned playing highlight the beautiful storytelling in the hopeful lyrics, as does Doncker's effective musical setting and arrangement.


Doncker is just as at home with heavy playing as he is with more upbeat songs, and in fact he shines in these instances, channeling classic rockers like Hendrix. Tunes like "Hellfighter of Harlem" and "Ground Zero" are good examples of this kind of playing and recall some of Hendrix's classics from the Band of Gypsies era. Both these tunes feature lyrics that deal with violence and war, which is a common theme in the poetry of Komunyakaa, inspired by his time serving in the Vietnam war. "Hellfighter" proclaims "Study war no more," "Fightin' Jim Crow over here to fight a war over there," and includes a spoken word interlude about WWI. The backbeat driven groove and heavily distorted guitar set the atmosphere.

More lighthearted tracks include "Can't Say No," with its playful, bouncy groove and "Fun City" which is more akin to an R&B or soul track along the lines of something Curtis Mayfield may have done. One of the highlights of the record is also one of the feelgood tracks on the album. The laid-back "Coney Island" is a happy 12/8 throwback reminiscent of some poppy tunes of the 60's, with vivid lyrics recalling good memories with a dreamy air about them, with Doncker singing "Do I still exist?" 

Doncker's second full length album under his own name is a solid effort with impressive songwriting and playing. Komunyakaa's lyrics are a huge draw here too; the award winning poet's meditations, stories and discussions lend the music an unprecedented level of depth. Definitely a record worth checking out for fans of rock and blues guitar.


01. Big Apple Blues
02. Can't Say No
03. The New Day
04. Hellfighter of Harlem
05. At This Midnight Hour
06. Little Blue Room
07. Coney Island
08. That Horse
09. Ground Zero
10. Fun City

Tomás Doncker: Lead Vocals, Guitars
David Barnes: Harmonica, Vocals
Nick Rolfe: Keyboards, Vocals
Josh David: Bass, Vocals
James Dellatacoma: Guitar
Mike Faulkner: Drums
Damon Duewhite: Drums
Mark Henry: Sax


JAVI

miércoles, 17 de diciembre de 2014

Lester Bowie - The Great Pretender (2014) 2 CD



In 1981, ECM released the much acclaimed "The Great Pretender" by Lester Bowie and his band interpreting gospels in a contemporary and jazzy way, mixing tradition with humor and avant-garde outbursts.

Now, Jazzwerkstatt releases a double CD with the same title and with an almost similar concept. The first CD is fully in the same vein as the ECM album, with a band consisting of Fontella Bass, Martha Bass and David Peaston on vocals, Ari Brown on sax, Art Matthews on piano, Fred Williams on bass, Philip Wilson on drums. The live performance was recorded in Berlin in 1982.

The concept is almost the same : well-known gospel songs and hymns such as "Jesus Loves Me", "He's Got The World In His Hand", "I'm So Grateful", tracks which are also played like you would expect in any church, without trumpet or sax, just piano and vocals. But then you have the other tracks, "Mother's Mode + Peace", which is a long and jubilant free jazz piece, "Tobabo, Tobago" with its fun Carribean rhythm, the slow blues "It's A Mean Old World", and the rock'n'roller "Let The Good Times Roll", and ending with the hair-raising "The Great Pretender".

And you're right, this is a quick journey through the history of African American music, reverent, soulful, joyful and fun, and it will be a great addition to the fans of the ECM album.

The second CD is a totally different thing, and you can even wonder why both albums are sold together, because they have absolutely nothing in common, and with absolutely, I mean absolutely.

Next to Bowie on trumpet, we have William Parker on bass, and Philip Wilson on drums. The performance was recorded in New York in 1991, to my knowledge the only trio performance of Bowie, next to Kahil El'Zabar's Ritual Trio album "The Ancestors Are Among Us".

The CD starts with "Cool", a bluesy duet with William Parker that will please everybody for its beautiful and sad sound, and great pulse. "Philadelphia" is a very nervous improvisation on which Bowie's sound is raw and percussive even and soulful and inventive, a real joy to hear for fans of the master.  "Steel And Breath" has Wilson in a star role, thundering away on his kit, with Bowie taking up the challenge for some fantastic dialogues, reminiscent of their duo album.

How record labels present and promote their music is often a mystery, and this is again confirmed here by Jazzwerkstatt (which is for any interested buyer an absolute disaster website to find information), but that should not deter interested fans. If you are a fan of free music, just download the second CD from the usual sites. If you are a fan of Bowie, buy the whole thing.


Disc 1

1. Mother's Mode
2. Yes, Jesus Loves Me 
3. Tobago, Tobago
4. It's a Mean Old Man's World
5. When The Spirit Comes Back To Me
6. He's Got The Whole World In His Hand
7. I'm So Grateful
8. Let the Good Times Roll
9. Great Pretender

Disc 2

1. Cool
2. Philadelphia
3. Steel and Breath

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra - OverTime: Music of Bob Brookmeyer (2014)




A punto de cumplir medio siglo de vida (fue fundada en 1966 por Thad Jones y Mel Lewis), The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra continúa actuando en vivo en el mítico Village Vanguard, y publicando grabaciones. Su nueva entrega, OverTime, está dedicada al gran Bob Brookmeyer. El trombonista, pianista y compositor, fallecido en 2011, es el compositor de toda la música (salvo “Skylark”) y autor de todos los arreglos. De los siete temas propios, tres de ellos (“XYZ”, “The Big Time” y “Sad Song”) no han sido grabados con anterioridad, mientras que las cuatro piezas restantes de Brookmeyer fueron escritas a lo largo de los años para esta formación.

En la orquesta sobresalen varios solistas con unas muy importantes carreras individuales ya que suenan magníficamente: Dick Oatts, Gary Smullyan, Terell Stafford, Jim McNeely, David Peel, Rich Perry… aunque lo que caracteriza a la grabación por encima de las individualidades es la elegancia y sofisticación con que Brookmeyer dotó tanto a las composiciones como a los arreglos. Esto permite que la atención del oyente se pueda desplazar entre los solos y unos arreglos que resaltan las melodías. De ese modo en un mismo tema se pueden producir sucesivos cambios de tempo, o tras unos arreglos (que en cualquier momento pueden sufrir variaciones) a la orquesta le suceden unos solos o dúos stricto sensu. OverTime evidencia la enorme inteligencia musical de Bob Brookmeyer. El empleo de todos los recursos disponibles sirvieron para que él junto con otros llevasen el concepto de “jazz orchestra” a un nuevo estadio.


1. The Big Time

Suite for Three 
2. Oatts
Dick Oatts, alto saxophone

3. Scott
Scott Wendholt, flugelhorn

4. Rich
Rich Perry, tenor saxophone

5. XYZ
Solos  John Riley, drums; David Wong, bass; Jim McNeely, piano; 
Billy Drewes, soprano saxophone; Rich Perry, tenor saxophone; 
Terell Stafford, trumpet; John Mosca, trombone

6. Skylark
Solo  Dick Oatts, alto saxophone

7. At the Corner of Ralph and Gary 
Solos  Ralph Lalama, tenor saxophone; Gary Smulyan, baritone saxophone

8. Sad Song
Solo  Dick Oatts, flute

THE BAND

TRUMPETS/FLUGELHORNS
Nick Marchione
Tanya Darby
Terell Stafford
Scott Wendholt

TROMBONES
John Mosca
Luis Bonilla
Jason Jackson (bass & tenor trombone)
Douglas Purviance (bass trombone)

REEDS
Dick Oatts (alto & soprano saxophones, flute)
Billy Drewes (alto & soprano saxophones, flute)
Rich Perry (tenor saxophone, flute)
Ralph LaLama (tenor saxophone, flute, clarinet)
Gary Smulyan (baritone saxophone)

RHYTHM SECTION
Jim McNeely (piano)
John Riley (drums)
David Wong (bass)

Frank Basile (bass clarinet) on Scott, XYZ and Sad Song
David Peel (french horn) on The Big Time, Skylark, XYZ and Sad Song
Mike Truesdell (percussion) on The Big Time, XYZ and Sad Song

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

lunes, 15 de diciembre de 2014

Christian Herluf Pedersen Transatlantic - Autumn Sketch (2014)

Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆


Christian Herluf Pedersen was originally born in small town Skals in Denmark, where is fathers love and devotion for music inspired him to pick up the saxophone at the age of 11. In 1996 he traveled to USA to attend Berklee College of Music, but after 1 year he decided to move back to Denmark to work as a musician.
In 1998 he moved to Sweden to study saxophone from Cennet Jönsson at Fridhems Folkhögskola, and then on to Stockholm where he was accepted at the Royal Music Conservatory. In 2006 he completed his studies in Stockholm (studied from Joakim Milder and Karl-Martin Almqvist among others) and has been working as a freelance musician since!
Christian Herluf Pedersen is a well known member of various ensembles across many different genres and emerged in 2009 as a band leader and composer on his debut album “Christian Herluf Pedersen - Alliance”.
Christian Herluf Pedersen is playing and touring Sweden and Europe with, among others: Alliance, Transatlantic, Ahmadu Jarr & the Highlife Orchestra, Big Band Splash, JnJO, Danny and the Cappers, Azimuth 3 +1, Lil Gizelle and various DJ’s.

Having met at Berklee College of Music in 1996, Christian Herluf Pedersen invited Asen Doykin and Mathias Kunzli to reunite in Sweden for a tour in February 2014. The tour was joined by bass player Pär-Ola Landin and ended with a 1 day recording session resulting in the album “Autumn Sketch”. None of the tracks on the album has been edited and consists of only first and second takes – all to capture live musicians performing live music.


1. Black Snow 06:32
2. Snail on the Slope 06:38
3. Autumn Sketch 05:46
4. Again & Again 06:12
5. Aqua Queen 08:00
6. Dark City Lights 06:25
7. Marigold 06:39
8. Some Other Times 07:17
9. The Way Back 07:09
   
  
Asen Doykin – Piano
Christian Herluf Pedersen – Tenor Saxophone
Pär-Ola Landin – Double bass
Mathias Kunzli – Drums


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 




GAB

domingo, 14 de diciembre de 2014

RONALDO ALBENZIO: JAZZ by JAZZ


Última entrega de RONALDO ALBENZIO y su JAZZ by JAZZ para este año que finaliza con una cuidada selección de propuestas para pasar una hora muy agradable. No se lo pierdan.

RONALDO ALBENZIO nos transmite sus mejores deseos y les desea a todos ustedes un feliz 2015!!!

En esta ocasión contamos con:

J. J. JOHNSON

BOZ SCAGGS

JESSICA WILLIAMS

JACKIE MCLEAN

ANITA KERR

GARY URWIN JAZZ ORCHESTRA

CESAR MACHADO

ENTRE OTROS...








ESCUCHEN Y DISFRUTEN!!!

JAZZ by JAZZ

de la mano de

RONALDO ALBENZIO

Todos los Domingos a las 19:00h. (hora Brasil)


RONALDO ALBENZIO - JAZZ by JAZZ

Pinheiro-Amado-Pedroso - Triology (2014)


Source & Label: Sintoma Records
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 




"O trio guitarra, baixo e bateria é das formações mais marcantes da história do jazz nas ultimas décadas.

Desde a tradição de Wes Montgomery ou Joe Pass, a estética desta formação tem sido renovada atè aos dias de hoje por nomes como Jim Hall, John Scofield, Bill Frisell, Mike Stern, Kurt Rosenwinkel entre muitos outros.

O projecto TRIOLOGY, constituído por três músicos com vasto percurso no panorama musical português, emerge dessa tradição, apresentando uma estética moderna a um repertório onde constam jazz standards bem como temas mais populares de bandas como Beatles ou Soundgarden."

"The trios composed of guitar, bass and drums are one of the most prominent instrumentations in modern jazz history.

Departing from the tradition of Wes Montgomery or Joe Pass trios, the art of this formation was pushed forward to present days by names such as Jim Hall, John Scofield, Bill Frisell, Mike Stern, Kurt Rosenwinkel, amongst many others.

TRIOLOGY is the result of collective work of three musicians with a large background in the portuguese jazz scene, following the tradition of the jazz guitar trio, but also exploring modern approaches to jazz standards as well as songs from bands like The Beatles and Soundgarden."

 

Fallling grace
Evidence
Someday my prince will come
 Black hole sun
In the wee small hours of the morning
Ditto
Norwegian wood

 
Ricardo Pinheiro - guitar and effects
Miguel Amado - electric bass and effects
Bruno Pedroso - drums and percussion



"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 

Patrick Wolff & The SFRJQ - Go Down Swinging (2014)


Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆


"Go Down Swinging" is the first release by the SFRJQ, a highly respected group of some of the Bay Area's finest jazz musicians. The quartet has evolved around Wolff's explorations of great and underplayed jazz compositions by musicians like Elmo Hope, Clifford Jordan, Lucky Thompson, Thelonious Monk, and others. Now entering its' third year of a weekly residency at San Francisco's Club Deluxe, the group plays with the loose, rolling energy and integrated sound that can only come from a working band. To capture the natural feel of the group in performance this album was recorded live to tape with no isolation, overdubs, or edits at Tiny Telephone Studios, engineered by Ian Pellicci, and mastered by A.T. Michael MacDonald.

Ignore the starchy name, with its intimations of formality and overthought programming. The San Francisco Repertory Jazz Quartet is a tough, gutsy and consistently inspired band dedicated to exploring a treasure trove of overlooked tunes.
Led by tenor saxophonist Patrick Wolff, the group plays compositions by mostly forgotten masters of the 1950s and '60 like pianist Elmo Hope and saxophonists Lucky Thompson and Clifford Jordan. While the music all falls within the modern jazz mainstream of the era, each tune is rife with idiosyncratic details that make it a welcome revelation.
"From about 1955 to 1968 was a golden age of jazz composition," says Wolff, who brings the SFRJQ to Cafe Stritch on May 31. "There was too much music for people to really take it in at the time, and some of these tunes were only recorded once. We're trying to take the time to actually explore them."
Wolff launched the band in 2012 on one of his ongoing Wednesday night gigs at San Francisco's Club Deluxe, a jazz spot in the Haight that features a regular rotation of top Bay Area musicians. Determined to use the opportunity to develop an interesting body of music, he decided against rounding up the usual standards.
Featuring Santa Cruz-raised drummer Smith Dobson V, pianist Adam Shulman and bassist Eric Markowitz, the band released its debut album last year, "Go Down Swinging." The most fascinating material is by Clifford Jordan, an undeservedly overlooked Chicago tenor saxophonist who died in 1993. While deeply influenced by John Coltrane's music of the early 1960s, Jordan distilled his sound to essentials. Read more...



1.Tom-Kattin' 05:25
2.Gallop's Gallop 06:15
3.Doug's Prelude 04:48
4.Powerful Paul Robeson 08:57
5.With Malice Towards None 06:36
6.Mid-nite Oil 06:23
7.A Lady's Vanity 06:15
8.One Second, Please 06:17
   

Patrick Wolff - Saxophones
Adam Shulman - Piano
Eric Markowitz - Bass
Smith Dobson V - Drums







"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 







sábado, 13 de diciembre de 2014

Jan Sturiale - Electric Water (2014)


Source: Allaboutjazz
Label: Drawtheline Records
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 


Jan Sturiale returned to the studio with a new quintet formation. Recorded at Tritone Studios, in Los Angeles, this is Sturiale's most international work, as much in the recording locations as in the musicians (and the featured vocalist) which shape his quintet. In this record, Electric Water (Drawtheline Records, 2014), he keeps developing his compositional language into a more accurate one.

Equilibrium is a term that better defines the final result of the nine tunes here that show the new musical stage of this Italian guitarist. Ballads like "Dark Grey" create a great space to explore the inner voice of each musician. This calm is not interrupted by faster rhythms as they don't break the atmosphere, instead they manage to maintain the comfortable texture through presto beats as in "Draw the line." So balance is, without doubt, the key principle in this album.

As in his previous record, Do not disturb the peace (Drawtheline Records, 2011), Jan Sturiale resorts to a crystalline voice to impress warmth in his compositions. This time, it's that of the Brazilian singer Tatiana Parra. Because of her, the quintet can be understood as a sextet considering that in the majority of her contributions here, Parra's voice functions as another instrument, moving in unison with the melodic lines of the guitar or the tenor saxophone. Although she is a Brazilian singer there is no musical fusion per se, but rather a kind of mood fusion which can be sensed in "Do sonho azul."

While Jan Sturiale has moved to a more contemporary jazz style, there is nevertheless still the presence of his rock background in tunes like "Echo," with a strong base provided by Chuan Horton's drums that combine with bassist Damian Erskine in opposition to the lyricism of Vardan Ovsepian on the piano.

Electric Water appeals because of its captivating simplicity, light but full of a sense of movement. There's a consistent energy irradiated especially by the convergence between the guitar and the tenor saxophone of Reynolds, a robust personality in this album. Everything fits naturally here, from the musical structures to the measured improvisations, allowing Jan Stuariale to be faithful to his musical purpose.  - Marta Ramon -



1. B Bay 05:33
2. In The Middle of Nowhere 06:06
3. Mark's Evolution 05:51
4. Do Sonho Azul (Part I) feat Tatiana Parra 00:54
5. Do Sonho Azul (Part II) feat Tatiana Parra 06:05
6. Draw The Line 05:01
7. Across feat Tatiana Parra 06:51
8. Electric Water 05:05
9. Echo 04:52
10.Dark Grey feat Tatiana Parra 05:12
   

Jan Sturiale - guitar
Bob Reynolds - tenor saxophone
Vardan Ovsepian - piano
Damian Erskine - bass
Chaun Duprè Horton - drums
Tatiana Parra - vocal


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 



Scott Feiner & Pandeiro Jazz - A View From Below (2014)


Source: Allaboutjazz
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆    


New York City-based jazz musician Scott Feiner's fourth recording as a leader draws attention to his unique artistry as a pandeiro player, which is a hand drum he discovered during his first trip to Brazil in 1999. As an educator, he's spread the good word with presentations and workshops across the globe. Interestingly enough, Feiner's percussive aplomb is almost beyond belief, especially when considering what he accomplishes on one relatively small drum. You can almost hear the fusion of a bass drum and snare underscoring his sweeping and undulating pulses, amid a broad textural aura in support of this smooth sailing jazz fusion voyage.

The trio embodies the Brazilian component but it doesn't really sequester your train of thought—unlike comparable efforts by others. It's a heterogeneous mix where keyboardist Rafael Vernet and guitarist Guilherme Monteiro operate with a Brazilian flavor, largely rendered Feiner, but the soloists are seeded within an undulating stream of jazz-centric soloing and some tenacious sound-shaping activities.

The group's bracing attack is spawned by Feiner's prominent grooves, where a sprightly organic-electric temporal plane remains a constant. Vernet's crisp phrasings on electric piano and Monteiro's slightly distorted electric guitar lines present a simmering outlook as they cleverly counterbalance one another along the way. On "Mother Nature," the musicians exercise a medium-tempo, loping and rather forceful groove, honed down by Vernet's beefy chord clusters and fluid single-note runs. But they shift the tide on "Raro Momento," which is a probing ballad, embellished by the guitarist's soul-searching developments. Here, Feiner uncannily mimics a drum kit and also enacts a spacious rhythmic foundation for the soloists.

"Fonte" is a spiraling jazz samba via the front line's agile soloing jaunts. Yet each piece intimates discreet melodies, used as frameworks for the artists' peppery interactions. And the program is subtly different than what many of us would anticipate, when considering similar hybrid world-jazz offerings. Hence, Feiner and associates think outside the box with this nouveau, sultry and rather zinging excursion that generates staying power on all conceivable fronts.  - Glenn Astarita -



1. A View From Below 06:02
2. Raízes 05:41
3. O Forno 05:00
4. Mother Nature 06:37
5. Sienna 03:48
6. Raro Momento 06:26
7. Fonte 05:09
8. Jasmine 04:14
9. The Visitor 06:06
    

Scott Feiner – Pandeiro
Guilherme Monteiro – Guitar
Rafael Vernet – Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 

jueves, 11 de diciembre de 2014

Frank Kimbrough - Quartet (2014)


Label: Palmetto Records
Source: Allaboutjazz
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆   


The majority of pianist Frank Kimbrough's albums have focused on the piano trio format, but he's certainly willing to try other things; he made that clear by recording in a duo with vibraphonist Joe Locke on more than one occasion, putting together a bass-less quartet for Noumena (Soul Note, 2000), and going it alone on Air (Palmetto, 2007). Now, with the plainly-titled Quartet, Kimbrough does it again. This time he's at the helm of a foursome that includes a pair of his colleagues from the Maria Schneider Orchestra—bassist Jay Anderson and saxophonist Steve Wilson—and drummer Lewis Nash, who Kimbrough first played with in the late '70s and reunited with more than three decades later in Ryan Truesdell's Gil Evans Project.

While Quartet is very much in line with Kimbrough's other work, and it exists in a comfort zone for Wilson and Anderson, it's something of a departure for Nash, a man who the jazz world is more accustomed to hearing in strict-time environments. Here, relieved from the requirement of firmly holding the rhythmic reins, he plays like a different man. On other outings, time snaps and bounces beneath his sticks, but here, time simply flows. It shouldn't be such a surprise that he can play in such fashion, given his deep and broad experience(s), but it still comes as something of a shock. He fully integrates himself into Kimbrough's world, living and breathing with the pianist and his music.

Together, all four men make for quite a combination. They stretch the fabric of swing ("Ode"), deliver deep-fried funky music ("Kudzu"), play it loose and pretty ("Beginning"), and explore the stark beauty that carries autumn into winter ("November"). In addition to the originals, Kimbrough and company add a wonderfully wobbly take on a John Lewis classic ("Afternoon In Paris"), turn in a gorgeous interpretation of a Kurt Weill work ("Trouble Man"), and close out the album with a classy nod to Rodgers and Hart ("It Never Entered My Mind"). Through it all, Kimbrough upholds and extends his reputation as a masterful musician capable of alternately giving shape and substance to the diaphanous and bending the shape of what has hitherto been structurally sound and solid. - Dan Bilawsky -






"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 



miércoles, 10 de diciembre de 2014

Ron Miles - Circuit Rider (2014)


Label: Yellowbird Records 
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆  


Ron Miles, a discreetly insurgent musician, is back with a little help from some notable friends. Following up on the well-received live souvenir Quiver, the Denver cornetist reconvenes his trio for the studio successor, Circuit Rider (October 14, 2014 by Enja/Yellowbird Records).

This, of course, is no ordinary trio; joining Miles again are guitar god Bill Frisell and drum god Brian Blade, perfect companions for a leader who only uses jazz as a starting point for his music, but typically ends up in a place not easily classifiable. It oddly feels comfortable, anyway.

Ron Miles’ frequent collaborations with Bill Frisell make sense from the standpoint of their shared Denver heritage, their fondness for melodies that sound simple (even when they aren’t), and the skill of getting a musical message fully across with no more notes than necessary. But in this trio, Miles is also capitalizing on what Marc Ribot calls is Frisell’s ability to “translate the pianistic harmonies Bill uses onto a six-stringed instrument.” The guitarist is filling in the piano role for Miles’ trio and does so like no other guitar player can. Blade was eventually added to supplement what was first a duo, but he can quickly locate the myriad of implied rhythms in each song and tease them out without being domineering about it.

Ultimately though, the thing that stands out on a Ron Miles record is Miles’ tone. It’s a lonely, wandering tone and his signature appears right at the commencement of the first track “Comma.” It partially obscures Frisell’s unsettled, gurgling thoughts before Frisell moves into a more hopeful tone, undertaking the harmony role to Miles’ roving lead lines; Blade just follows the uneven flow with uncanny accuracy. That pure tone also graces “Dancing Close And Slow,” a country ballad with a charmingly lazy gait.

Miles reels off a long, unbroken sequence of notes in medieval fashion for the title track, and Frisell repeats the feat amid the stilted rhythms of Blade. “The Flesh Is Weak” contains some of Blade’s typically sublime patter. Miles and Frisell meander their way through the melody prior to the guitarist settling into a repeating figure that gives the opportunity for Blade to loosen up and release.

The recycled songs offer another window into Miles’ musical interests. Whereas Quiver suggested an appreciation of the earliest jazz, Circuit Rider culls form the catalogue of two of the most innovative jazz conceptionalists from the 50s and 60s. “Jive Five Floor Four” (which was later titled “Free Cell Block F, ‘Tis Nazi USA”) is one of two Charles Mingus tunes heard here, lean and a little funky; smatterings of Blade’s limber second-line beat can be heard behind Frisell’s effortless rendering of Mingus’ not-so-straightforward melody. Miles and Frisell are able to abstract enough of the basic components originally recorded for a large band to capture the song’s swinging essence. The more familiar “Reincarnation Of A Lovebird” is reincarnated as a loose bluesy ditty with Miles and Frisell liberally trading lead roles, confirming that they know each other so well. Blade’s feel on this performance is why he’s a world-class drummer.

Jimmy Guiffre’s multiple personality “Two Kinds Of Blues” is the most straight jazz song here, containing some rare, rich octaves from Frisell, while Miles emotes in just the right measure. Midway through, Frisell signals the second melody and the mood turns a little playful before a more solemn take on the first melody ends the tune.

In leading this group of tonal and melodic masters, Ron Miles once again makes music ideal for those who savor those things served up in with angularity and superb group dynamics. What else would you expect from these guys?






"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 
Ron Miles, a discreetly insurgent musician, is back with a little help from some notable friends. Following up on the well-received live souvenir Quiver, the Denver cornetist reconvenes his trio for the studio successor, Circuit Rider (October 14, 2014 by Enja/Yellowbird Records).
This, of course, is no ordinary trio; joining Miles again are guitar god Bill Frisell and drum god Brian Blade, perfect companions for a leader who only uses jazz as a starting point for his music, but typically ends up in a place not easily classifiable. It oddly feels comfortable, anyway.
Ron Miles’ frequent collaborations with Bill Frisell make sense from the standpoint of their shared Denver heritage, their fondness for melodies that sound simple (even when they aren’t), and the skill of getting a musical message fully across with no more notes than necessary. But in this trio, Miles is also capitalizing on what Marc Ribot calls is Frisell’s ability to “translate the pianistic harmonies Bill uses onto a six-stringed instrument.” The guitarist is filling in the piano role for Miles’ trio and does so like no other guitar player can. Blade was eventually added to supplement what was first a duo, but he can quickly locate the myriad of implied rhythms in each song and tease them out without being domineering about it.
Ultimately though, the thing that stands out on a Ron Miles record is Miles’ tone. It’s a lonely, wandering tone and his signature appears right at the commencement of the first track “Comma.” It partially obscures Frisell’s unsettled, gurgling thoughts before Frisell moves into a more hopeful tone, undertaking the harmony role to Miles’ roving lead lines; Blade just follows the uneven flow with uncanny accuracy. That pure tone also graces “Dancing Close And Slow,” a country ballad with a charmingly lazy gait.
Miles reels off a long, unbroken sequence of notes in medieval fashion for the title track, and Frisell repeats the feat amid the stilted rhythms of Blade. “The Flesh Is Weak” contains some of Blade’s typically sublime patter. Miles and Frisell meander their way through the melody prior to the guitarist settling into a repeating figure that gives the opportunity for Blade to loosen up and release.
The recycled songs offer another window into Miles’ musical interests. Whereas Quiver suggested an appreciation of the earliest jazz, Circuit Rider culls form the catalogue of two of the most innovative jazz conceptionalists from the 50s and 60s. “Jive Five Floor Four” (which was later titled “Free Cell Block F, ‘Tis Nazi USA”) is one of two Charles Mingus tunes heard here, lean and a little funky; smatterings of Blade’s limber second-line beat can be heard behind Frisell’s effortless rendering of Mingus’ not-so-straightforward melody. Miles and Frisell are able to abstract enough of the basic components originally recorded for a large band to capture the song’s swinging essence. The more familiar “Reincarnation Of A Lovebird” is reincarnated as a loose bluesy ditty with Miles and Frisell liberally trading lead roles, confirming that they know each other so well. Blade’s feel on this performance is why he’s a world-class drummer.
Jimmy Guiffre’s multiple personality “Two Kinds Of Blues” is the most straight jazz song here, containing some rare, rich octaves from Frisell, while Miles emotes in just the right measure. Midway through, Frisell signals the second melody and the mood turns a little playful before a more solemn take on the first melody ends the tune.
In leading this group of tonal and melodic masters, Ron Miles once again makes music ideal for those who savor those things served up in with angularity and superb group dynamics. What else would you expect from these guys?
- See more at: http://somethingelsereviews.com/2014/10/08/ron-miles-bill-frisell-brian-blade-circuit-rider-2014/#sthash.1zBPUk8s.dpuf

sábado, 6 de diciembre de 2014

RONALDO ALBENZIO: JAZZ by JAZZ


Nuestro querido e infatigable amigo RONALDO ALBENZIO nos manda nuevos polvos mágicos. Variedad y versatilidad en esta remesa musical.  Contamos, entre otros, con:

Joe Henderson

Marcos Ariel

Helen Merrill

Phil Woods

Andrea Motis

Ken Peplowski

Julie London

Nico Assumpção


ESCUCHEN Y DISFRUTEN!!!

JAZZ by JAZZ

de la mano de

RONALDO ALBENZIO

Todos los Domingos a las 19:00h. (hora Brasil)


RONALDO ALBENZIO - JAZZ by JAZZ

The Project H - We Live Among The Lines (2014)


Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆


 Project H and their latest We Live Among The Lines welcomes you to the land of rhythm and groove. This septet pops with a vibrant horn driven sound that might best be described as part retro Chicago horns and part Snarky Puppy...and you can dance to it! Kansas City is home to a vibrant jazz community, their achilles heel would be competing with similar cities such as San Francisco, Portland and Austin Texas, Project H is their ace in the hole and the Midwest's best kept improvisational secret. Jazz, funk and soul are brought together with an amazing consistency. There is no wheelhouse just good music!

"Do It Up & Do It Right" has the horn section firing on all cylinders and their stuff is tight! "Dozer" maintains a smoldering groove highlighting the bands innate ability to change harmonic direction on the fly. "Vandelay" is a syncopated percussive groove which again shows a tremendous consistency not to mention a chemistry that seems to scream from ones speakers. Other artistic comparison could easily be made but they would be incredibly unfair. Project H is a cultural by product of their own experience with a voice that is distinctive and talent that has placed them on stage with the previously mentioned Snarky Puppy and The Bad Plus.

Championing independent artists is an easy gig when the band is this insanely good. One of the better releases across any genre for 2014. There should be a law against music being this much fun!



1. Not A Person 02:29
2. A Bear's Cage 06:18
3. Devolver 06:10
4. Do It Up & Do It Right 05:57
5. Skyfinger 06:01
6. Uncool Kids 05:49
7. Dozer 05:57
8. The Fall and Rise Of... 04:47
9. Vandelay 05:55
10.Until The End Is Near 07:27

 
Clint Ashlock- trumpet
Ryan Heinlein- trombone
Brett Jackson- woodwinds
Matt Leifer- drums
Andrew Ouellette- keys
Dominique Sanders- bass
Jeff Stocks- guitars



"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington -