jueves, 27 de abril de 2017

Aaron Parks - Find The Way (ECM 2017)



For the second ECM album by Aaron Parks – following the solo release Aborescence, which JazzTimes praised as “expansive, impressionistic… like a vision quest” – the prize-winning pianist has convened a trio featuring bassist Ben Street and drummer Billy Hart. The rhythm pair, which also teams in Hart’s hit quartet for ECM, blends fluidity and strength – what Parks calls “an oceanic” quality, producing waves of energy for the pianist to alternately ride and dive into. Find the Way has the aura of a piano-trio recording in the classic mold, from melody-rich opener “Adrift” to the closing title track, a cover of a romantic tune Parks grew to love on an LP by Rosemary Clooney and Nelson Riddle. Parks also drew inspiration for this album from the likes of Alice Coltrane and Shirley Horn (for whom Hart played); space and subtlety are a priority.


1.ADRIFT (Aaron Parks) 05:46
2.SONG FOR SASHOU (Aaron Parks) 06:22
3.UNRAVEL (Aaron Parks) 04:43
4.HOLD MUSIC (Aaron Parks) 04:19
5.THE STORYTELLER (Aaron Parks) 04:52
6.ALICE (Aaron Parks) 07:09
7.FIRST GLANCE (Aaron Parks) 05:41
8.MELQUÍADES (Aaron Parks) 05:27
9.FIND THE WAY (Ian Bernard) 05:58

Ben Street   Double Bass
Billy Hart   Drums



John Ferrara & Harvie S - Duo New York (2017)


John Ferrara is a pianist, composer, & arranger, who has performed with scores of jazz and non-jazz luminaries since becoming professional musician in 1963.These include Buddy Rich, Joe Williams, Nelson Riddle, Pacquito D'Rivera, Chico Hamilton, Philly Joe Jones, Major Holley, Al Grey, Doc Cheatham, Al Cohn, Hal Crook, George Mraz, Peter Donald, Glenna Gibson, Jack Wilkins, Clark Terry, Carmen Leggio, Charles McPherson, George Young, Lou Soloff, Joe Newman, Herb Pomeroy, and others. He has played shows with Suzanne Somers, Vaughn Monroe, Bob Crosby and many other notable performers. In addition to publishing two jazz piano books, he taught at several schools including the Berklee College of Music (1978-81). This is his second CD, the first one being “Intervals of Light”. John’s style reflects his affinity for Bill Evans, Oscar Peterson, Phineas Newborn, Hank Jones, Lennie Tristano, Bud Powell, and others. The tune selection includes two standards, “The Touch Of Your Lips”, and the Bill Evans masterpiece, “Turn Out the Stars”. The others are all originals written by Mr. Ferrara specifically for this recording date.

Harvie S is an award winning bassist, educator, composer, arranger, and producer. A legendary bassist, he has performed and recorded with Stan Getz, Chet Baker, Dexter Gordon, Tony Bennett, Ray Baretto, Michael Brecker, Jean Pierre Rampal, Paquito D’Rivera, Gil Evans, Art Farmer, Mark Turner, Jim Hall, Stefon Harris, Billy Hart, Lee Konitz, Yusef Lateef, Dave Leibman, Joe Lovano, Pat Metheny, Paul Motian, Chico O’Farrill, Danilo Perez, Maria Schneider, Zoot Sims, Toots Thielemans, Ray Vega, James Williams, Phil Woods, Louie Bellson and countless others. He can be heard on twenty albums as a leader, fifteen as a co-leader, and over four hundred albums as a sideman. Harvie’s album with the legendary Sheila Jordan Harvie S duo is a magical live performance released on High Note Records in 2012 called “Yesterdays”. Jazz times included it in the best 100 recordings of 2012.

1. This One's for Charlie (feat. Harvie S) 3:57
2. The Touch of Your Lips (feat. Harvie S) 5:23
3. Turn out the Stars (feat. Harvie S) 5:44
4. New York Blues (feat. Harvie S) 4:05
5. Last Dance (feat. Harvie S) 4:09
6. I Remember Clare Fischer (feat. Harvie S) 4:39
7. Deep Ocean (feat. Harvie S) 5:50
8. When You Were Here (feat. Harvie S) 6:49
9. Uptown Swing (feat. Harvie S) 4:17

John Ferrara, piano
Harvie S, double bass


Composer / Bari player Brian Landrus' Monumental Orchestra debut out July 28



Composer and Baritone Saxophonist Brian Landrus Reveals a Thrilling, Ground-Breaking New Vision for the Jazz Orchestra on Generations, out July 28 via ArtistShare

The 25-piece Brian Landrus Orchestra makes a stunning debut with sweeping compositions inspired by generations of composers, genres and family

“This is really like nothing I've ever heard before.  It's going to be amazing and I can't wait to hear the final product!” – Joe Locke

“To be part of Brian's vision is enlightening.  It causes me optimism."  Billy Hart



Monumental in creative ambition, imaginative scope, and artistic achievement – not to mention sheer scale – Generations is the breathtaking debut of the Brian Landrus Orchestra, a 25-piece all-star ensemble stocked with a stunning array of the most inventive musicians in modern music. These adventurous virtuosos have congregated to realize the extraordinary, sweeping music of composer, baritone saxophonist and low woodwind master Brian Landrus, whose work combines a lifetime’s worth of wide-ranging listening and playing into an arrestingly bold, radiant and singular vision.

Far from a standard big band project and unlike any orchestral jazz ensemble that’s come before it, the Brian Landrus Orchestra incorporates inspiration from classical music, hip-hop, soul, funk, jazz, reggae and world music – with “inspiration” being the key word. In Landrus’ inventive hands these diverse genres are deconstructed and absorbed, emerging in startling and unrecognizable ways to conjure a dramatic and thrilling sonic landscape.


The title Generations carries multiple meanings for Landrus – including influences that span centuries from Bach to Ellington to Motown to Led Zeppelin to J Dilla; the family members that inspired Landrus and his music, from his father to his children; and the generations of musicians who’ve come together to breathe life into these deeply personal compositions. The drum chair alone features a four-decade difference in age, from the legendary Billy Hart to rising star drummer Justin Brown.

The awe-inspiring ensemble also features Jamie Baum, Tom Christensen, Darryl Harper, Michael Rabinowitz, Alden Banta and Landrus himself on woodwinds; Debbie Schmidt, Ralph Alessi, Igmar Thomas, Alan Ferber and Marcus Rojas on brass; harpist Brandee Younger and a string section featuring Sara Caswell, Mark Feldman, Joyce Hammann, Meg Okura, Lois Martin, Nora Krohn, Jody Redhage and Maria Jeffers; vibraphonist Joe Locke; and bassists Jay Anderson and Lonnie Plaxico. The Orchestra is conducted by bandleader JC Sanford, who has also held the baton for the John Hollenbeck Large Ensemble and the Alice Coltrane Orchestra. Landrus co-produced the album with fellow composers Robert Livingston Aldridge and Frank Carlberg.

Landrus comes to the project with a wealth of experience both as a leader and as a performer with some of the world’s most distinctive artists from a variety of genres: he’s toured the world in superstar Esperanza Spalding’s band and played in Ryan Truesdell’s prize-winning Gil Evans Project as well as working with the likes of Bob Brookmeyer, Rufus Reid, Danilo Perez, Frank Kimbrough, Gary Smulyan, Maria Schneider, The Temptations, The Four Tops, Martha Reeves, George Garzone, Bob Moses, Louis Nash, Nicholas Urie, Jerry Bergonzi, Ayn Inserto, Alan Ferber, Uri Caine and Ralph Alessi, among others.

Generations is the culmination of a long-held dream for Landrus, whose previous releases – both with his Quartet and the aptly-named Kaleidoscope – were vibrant but necessarily scaled-down interpretations of the saxophonist’s formidable ambitions. “I’ve had these colors in my head for as far back as I can remember,” he says. “I would always have to strip down what I was hearing into its raw form to use what I had available to me.”

A full-scale orchestra project began to seem more within reach once Landrus, who holds two master’s degrees (in jazz composition and jazz saxophone) from New England Conservatory, entered a PhD program in classical composition at Rutgers University. Studying the scores of the world’s greatest composers, he was compelled to allow his vision free rein, leading to the multi-hued, densely inventive music of Generations. Of course, such a mammoth undertaking is easier to fantasize than to achieve, but a combination of passion, risk-taking and determination allowed Landrus to bring the orchestra to fruition.


Landrus’ compositions incorporate his encyclopedic influences in ground-breaking, original fashion. The merger of hip-hop and jazz for instance, has become a common one; but you’ll hear no easily identifiable grooves or beats in Landrus’ music. Instead, the composer spent years transcribing dozens of hip-hop tracks, with an especial concentration on the work of pioneering producer J Dilla, and then parceled those rhythms into the strings. The result is an unconventional but invitingly complex weave of sounds and textures that converge in deft, surprising forms.

“Growing up listening to Motown and hip-hop and everything else that I loved and played with, those influences were going to creep in regardless of what I did,” Landrus says. “I just had to try to put them together as well as I could and try to imagine how it could all work. It’s a puzzle to get it to fit together properly, but it gives the music a different color that I’ve never heard before, familiar but new.”

The centerpiece of the album, and its launching-off point, is the “Jeru Concerto,” a four-movement feature for the composer’s baritone named for and inspired by his son Jeru – the namesake of bari master Gerry “Jeru” Mulligan and not yet born when Landrus began writing the piece. Propelled by the throaty churn of the orchestra’s low voices, the first movement envelops Landrus’ sinuous lines in lushly wafting strings and buoyant percussion; a solo turn for the leader initiates the gentle second movement, while the third mingles tension and tenderness, perhaps an illustration of the nervous anticipation that ushers any newborn into the world. The final movement, penned after Jeru’s birth, explodes with an infectious joy unable to contain a father’s pride.

Landrus’ family is also at the core of several other pieces. His daughter lends her name to “Ruby,” who recognized her inquisitive spirit in the music as he was writing it. The haunting “Every Time I Dream” depicts a love that proved elusive for years until finally becoming embodied. Landrus pays tribute to his father with “The Warrior,” which depicts not a ferocious fighter but a man of gentle strength and stoic perseverance.

“Orchids” began as a dream, an atmosphere evocatively suggested by the combination of Brandee Younger’s harp and Joe Locke’s vibes. The love story gradually builds to an ecstatic crescendo, but ends on an ambiguous note – like many dreams and, sadly, many romances. “Arrow in the Night,” its title taken from a Buddhist saying regarding evil people who lurk in the shadows, came to Landrus fully formed, its mesmerizing, slow surges like broad, intense brush strokes. “Human Nature” evolves from the solitary to the communal, maintaining a spiritual urgency throughout as the unsung title lyrics are passed from instrument to instrument. The rhythmic intricacy of “Arise” was inspired by a dance collaboration and imbibes elements from Electronic Dance Music (EDM) and Latin jazz, though as always in transformative ways.



Laura Dubin Trio Live at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival New CD Show @ Club Bonafide 4/30/17


Laura Dubin Trio
CD Release Concert
Live at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

Sunday, April 30th
Set Times: 7:30-8:30 pm (one set only)
Club Bonafide
212 East 52nd Street
New York NY, 10022
(between 2nd Ave and 3rd Ave, closer to 3rd Ave)
(646) 918-6189
$10, plus 2 drink minimum for table service


Featuring
Mike Forfia (bass)
Antonio Guerrero (drums)


Imagine how fulfilling it must be for a musician to grow up under the influence of your hometown’s major jazz festival, travel around the world in quest of musical development, and then return to your hometown to perform at that same festival. Then, take it a step further and imagine delivering a triumphant performance that brings down the house. Well that’s exactly what happened for the remarkable pianist Laura Dubin, fully evidenced with her extraordinary new album, Laura Dubin Trio Live at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.

In the company of her life and musical partner, brilliant drummer Antonio H. Guerrero, and the outstanding bassist Kieran Hanlon, Laura’s trio embodies the essence of synergy and unity of purpose that is essential for jazz and all creative music at its highest level. Each piece is thoroughly conceived and structured to provide a fully conceptual canvas to paint the pictures of adventurous exploration and spontaneity that are at the heart of Laura’s music.  

Laura’s consummate skills as a pianist are deeply steeped in the entire tradition of jazz piano, giving her a total command of the vernacular. Combining this with her mastery of the western classical piano tradition, her stunning musicianship is on full display throughout. It’s never in any showy or ostentatious manner, but rather in her being able to deftly apply her flawless technique in the perfect manner to tell the compelling stories she depicts through her artistry.

Guerrero and Hanlon are the ideal partners – not sidemen, but rather collaborators. Guerrero anticipates every nuance of Laura’s playing, dancing a pas de deux with her at all times, while Hanlon provides the thrust and body that buoys the music while also setting it free. Their interplay is marvelous and their solo segments are fully conceived within the musical structure – Guerrero’s often powered by Laura’s support, and Hanlon’s always lyrical and fluid, with his arco playing cello-like in its alluring texture.


The repertoire is truly enchanting – calling upon so much of what has been so influential upon Laura from both the jazz and classical side, not only in terms of the specific pieces, but also connected with those who have been so essential to the development of her own musical vision. The 21 tracks include 27 separate compositions, including ten Dubin originals – all imaginative and beautifully crafted– and a rich assortment of classics from the repertoires of jazz, the Great American Songbook and European classical composers.

Two timeless classical works – Mozart’s Sonata No. 11 “Rondo alla Turca” and Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 “Pathetique” – are vividly re-imagined; the Beethoven interwoven with a variety of Songbook themes, and the Mozart an excursion into boogie-woogie, stride, barrelhouse, bebop and swing.

Three more classical works are contained within five medleys, each integrated together seamlessly into a unified whole. A punchy take on Ravel’s Prelude from Le Tombeau de Couperin melds with a Latin-tinged excursion on Rodgers & Hammerstein’s My Favorite Things; an evolved version of Chopin’s Minute Waltz is birthed from a captivating musing on Ellington’s gorgeous Prelude to a Kiss; and a beautifully poignant rendition of Debussy’s Reflets dans l’eau blends with the equally exquisite Gershwin masterpiece Our Love Is Here to Stay. 

The other two medleys reflect upon another element that is present throughout the album – homage to some of Laura’s deepest inspirations. Three of her favorite Chick Corea pieces – No Mystery/Now He Sings, Now He Sobs/Spain – are combined for a sumptuous feast; and Bill Evans is offered her personal heartfelt tribute with her own composition Waltz for Bill, morphing into an upbeat take on Cole Porter’s It’s De-Lovely.


The spirit of homage continues with a solo jaunt on Fats Waller’s Handful of Keys incorporating stride, barrelhouse, waltz and touches of Erroll Garner and Bach; and three originals – Kelly Green, a sojourn in bouncy blues quite appropriate to its subject Wynton Kelly; Invention for Nina, evoking the spirit of Bach for his great admirer, the glorious Ms. Simone; and a tribute to Laura’s primary influence, Oscar Peterson, in the confident easy swing of Ode to O.P.

Oscar’s influence is also on display in the up-tempo album opener, Steve Allen’s This Could Be the Start of Something Big; Gershwin on tap again for I Got Rhythm with a modern and modal twist; and blazing the proper mode for Michel Camilo’s Latin burner On Fire; while Donald Brown’s New York has the vehement in-your face quality of its namesake in both composition and performance.

Six more of Laura’s originals comprise the remainder of this terrific album, including the up-tempo smoker Green Arrow; the grooving romp Something’s Cookin’ ; the appropriately rumbling and tumultuous Thunderstorm with Laura in McCoy Tyner-ish intensity; and Doc Z, based on the chords of Sonny Rollins Doxy with Laura in the blues mode of Oscar, with a nice touch of Red Garland in tow. Reprised from Laura’s acclaimed debut album Introducing the Laura Dubin Trio (as is Ode to O.P.) are Anxiety, driven by infectious bass ostinatos and the rollicking album closer Barcelona, alternating between scorching and swinging with Laura in that Spanish chord drive in the manner of McCoy on Coltrane’s spectacular Olé.



A splendid expedition from start to finish, this radiant music is marked by another element that is so important – a sense of sheer joyousness in the spirited essence of making music.





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