sábado, 13 de diciembre de 2014

Jan Sturiale - Electric Water (2014)


Source: Allaboutjazz
Label: Drawtheline Records
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 


Jan Sturiale returned to the studio with a new quintet formation. Recorded at Tritone Studios, in Los Angeles, this is Sturiale's most international work, as much in the recording locations as in the musicians (and the featured vocalist) which shape his quintet. In this record, Electric Water (Drawtheline Records, 2014), he keeps developing his compositional language into a more accurate one.

Equilibrium is a term that better defines the final result of the nine tunes here that show the new musical stage of this Italian guitarist. Ballads like "Dark Grey" create a great space to explore the inner voice of each musician. This calm is not interrupted by faster rhythms as they don't break the atmosphere, instead they manage to maintain the comfortable texture through presto beats as in "Draw the line." So balance is, without doubt, the key principle in this album.

As in his previous record, Do not disturb the peace (Drawtheline Records, 2011), Jan Sturiale resorts to a crystalline voice to impress warmth in his compositions. This time, it's that of the Brazilian singer Tatiana Parra. Because of her, the quintet can be understood as a sextet considering that in the majority of her contributions here, Parra's voice functions as another instrument, moving in unison with the melodic lines of the guitar or the tenor saxophone. Although she is a Brazilian singer there is no musical fusion per se, but rather a kind of mood fusion which can be sensed in "Do sonho azul."

While Jan Sturiale has moved to a more contemporary jazz style, there is nevertheless still the presence of his rock background in tunes like "Echo," with a strong base provided by Chuan Horton's drums that combine with bassist Damian Erskine in opposition to the lyricism of Vardan Ovsepian on the piano.

Electric Water appeals because of its captivating simplicity, light but full of a sense of movement. There's a consistent energy irradiated especially by the convergence between the guitar and the tenor saxophone of Reynolds, a robust personality in this album. Everything fits naturally here, from the musical structures to the measured improvisations, allowing Jan Stuariale to be faithful to his musical purpose.  - Marta Ramon -



1. B Bay 05:33
2. In The Middle of Nowhere 06:06
3. Mark's Evolution 05:51
4. Do Sonho Azul (Part I) feat Tatiana Parra 00:54
5. Do Sonho Azul (Part II) feat Tatiana Parra 06:05
6. Draw The Line 05:01
7. Across feat Tatiana Parra 06:51
8. Electric Water 05:05
9. Echo 04:52
10.Dark Grey feat Tatiana Parra 05:12
   

Jan Sturiale - guitar
Bob Reynolds - tenor saxophone
Vardan Ovsepian - piano
Damian Erskine - bass
Chaun Duprè Horton - drums
Tatiana Parra - vocal


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 



Scott Feiner & Pandeiro Jazz - A View From Below (2014)


Source: Allaboutjazz
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆    


New York City-based jazz musician Scott Feiner's fourth recording as a leader draws attention to his unique artistry as a pandeiro player, which is a hand drum he discovered during his first trip to Brazil in 1999. As an educator, he's spread the good word with presentations and workshops across the globe. Interestingly enough, Feiner's percussive aplomb is almost beyond belief, especially when considering what he accomplishes on one relatively small drum. You can almost hear the fusion of a bass drum and snare underscoring his sweeping and undulating pulses, amid a broad textural aura in support of this smooth sailing jazz fusion voyage.

The trio embodies the Brazilian component but it doesn't really sequester your train of thought—unlike comparable efforts by others. It's a heterogeneous mix where keyboardist Rafael Vernet and guitarist Guilherme Monteiro operate with a Brazilian flavor, largely rendered Feiner, but the soloists are seeded within an undulating stream of jazz-centric soloing and some tenacious sound-shaping activities.

The group's bracing attack is spawned by Feiner's prominent grooves, where a sprightly organic-electric temporal plane remains a constant. Vernet's crisp phrasings on electric piano and Monteiro's slightly distorted electric guitar lines present a simmering outlook as they cleverly counterbalance one another along the way. On "Mother Nature," the musicians exercise a medium-tempo, loping and rather forceful groove, honed down by Vernet's beefy chord clusters and fluid single-note runs. But they shift the tide on "Raro Momento," which is a probing ballad, embellished by the guitarist's soul-searching developments. Here, Feiner uncannily mimics a drum kit and also enacts a spacious rhythmic foundation for the soloists.

"Fonte" is a spiraling jazz samba via the front line's agile soloing jaunts. Yet each piece intimates discreet melodies, used as frameworks for the artists' peppery interactions. And the program is subtly different than what many of us would anticipate, when considering similar hybrid world-jazz offerings. Hence, Feiner and associates think outside the box with this nouveau, sultry and rather zinging excursion that generates staying power on all conceivable fronts.  - Glenn Astarita -



1. A View From Below 06:02
2. Raízes 05:41
3. O Forno 05:00
4. Mother Nature 06:37
5. Sienna 03:48
6. Raro Momento 06:26
7. Fonte 05:09
8. Jasmine 04:14
9. The Visitor 06:06
    

Scott Feiner – Pandeiro
Guilherme Monteiro – Guitar
Rafael Vernet – Fender Rhodes, Wurlitzer


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB