jueves, 13 de noviembre de 2014

Jason Adasiewicz's Sun Rooms - From the Region (2014)



Vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz has become known for boundary-shattering exploration through his work with improvisers such as Josh Berman, Keefe Jackson, Jeb Bishop, Rob Mazurek and Mike Reed (who appears on this CD). His own music, though, is as welcoming as it is challenging. Even listeners with relatively conventional tastes can feel at home in Adasiewicz’s aesthetic world.


Adasiewicz’s lush harmonies, roomy echo, unforced attack and expansive, non-linear melodic/chordal structures evoke dreamlike soundscapes both warm and captivating; he exploits his instrument’s percussive nature to coax his listeners to “bob their heads and let the music be social,” as he puts it in the liner notes. Drummer Reed is likewise dexterous but never harsh; he doesn’t “swing the band” (as we used to say) as much as he participates in and enlivens the swing that evolves organically from the interplay among himself, Adasiewicz and bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten.


On an aggressively experimental piece like “Mr. PB,” Adasiewicz’s declamations sound like battling church bells. Ballads such as “Cubane” and Reed’s “I Forgot the Words” alternate between clock-like interplay and sections of free-flowing creation, where beats, notes and rhythmic punctuations dance in three-way counterpoint and then move into realms of stasis. “Is a Bell a Rose,” the closer, probably exemplifies this trio’s musical personality most fully: It’s structured like a series of questions, each segment ending at an upward angle, enlivened by Adasiewicz’s quick-wristed flurries, with a rare arco interlude from Håker Flaten. It ends on yet another question mark, a kind of “To Be Continued,” making us all the more eager to anticipate what’s coming next.


Jason Adasiewicz: vibraphone
Ingebrigt Haker-Flaten: bass
Mike Reed: drums

01. Leeza
02. Classic Route
03. The Song I Wrote for Tonight
04. Mae Flowers
05. Mr. PB
06. Two Comes One
07. Old Sparky
08. I Forgot the Words
09. Cubane
10. Just Talkin’ to Myself
11. Is a Bell a Rose


JAVI

WAYNE KRANTZ - GOOD PIRANHA / BAD PIRANHA (2014)


Source & Label: Abstractlogix
Gab's Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 


Known globally for his uncompromising musical vision, staggering virtuosity and deep reserves of soul, Wayne Krantz is one of very few modern guitarists to venture beyond the instrument’s limitations and create an identifiably original style and sound. Good Piranha/Bad Piranha is his full-throttle double-take on four contemporary pop and hip-hop songs, from which he plunders the textural, rhythmic and harmonic intrigue that has come to define each of his unique projects.

GPBP CD CoverFollowing 2012′s critically acclaimed Howie 61—a record packed with cleverly arranged, hard-hitting original songs and a small army of masterful sidemen—Krantz has scaled back the setting and material for his tenth outing as a leader. Good Piranha/Bad Piranha finds his trio in the studio revisiting a selection of cover tunes they performed during legendary recent appearances at the 55 Bar in Greenwich Village.

Presenting two distinct versions each of Pendulum’s “Comprachicos,” M.C. Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This,” Ice Cube’s “My Skin is My Sin” and Radiohead vocalist Thom Yorke’s “Black Swan,” Krantz extracts and serves up a surprising range of nuance by switching up musicians and applying his inimitable instrumental inventiveness. Each song’s multiple takes allow the group(s) to reimagine the material from unexpected angles, making use of subtle rhythmic and melodic shifts to frame a dazzling display of the guitarist’s revered melodic and chordal innovations; he intertwines his stark, elastic tones with the familiar tunes’ snaky rhythmic skeletons and insistent basslines to create wholly new works.

Joining Krantz on Good Piranha/Bad Piranha are his longtime trio mates Keith Carlock (Steely Dan, Sting) on drums and Tim Lefebvre (Tedeschi Trucks Band) on bass. Recent cohort Nate Wood (Kneebody) reprises his chameleonic role in Krantz’ touring band, appearing here on bass for the first versions of the four tunes and then on drums for the second. The material is delicately enhanced by occasional vocal interjections courtesy Gabriela Anders.

Since the late ’80s Wayne Krantz has been revered as one of the world’s great guitarists, working alongside such rock legends as Steely Dan (both as a bandmember and later on solo projects by Donald Fagen), jazz saxophonists Michael Brecker, Chris Potter and David Binney, composer Carla Bley and drum icon Billy Cobham. In addition to his influential studio albums as a leader, Krantz has released several recordings of his celebrated live trio performances, which have become major concert draws worldwide for fans of powerfully adventurous improvised music.

 

01. Black Swan
02. My Skin Is My Sin
03. Comprachicos
04. U Can’t Touch This
05. Black Swan
06. My Skin Is My Sin
07. Comprachicos
08. U Can’t Touch This


Wayne Krantz - guitar
Keith Carlock - drums
Tim Lefebvre - bass
Nate Wood - bass/drums
Gabriela Anders - vocals
01. Black Swan
02. My Skin Is My Sin
03. Comprachicos
04. U Can’t Touch This
05. Black Swan
06. My Skin Is My Sin
07. Comprachicos
08. U Can’t Touch This - See more at: http://label.abstractlogix.com/?p=1387#sthash.Qm2Lp03R.dpuf



"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 


GAB
 
Abstract Logix

Wayne Krantz: Good Piranha/Bad Piranha


Release Date: November 18, 2014


New Album from guitar maverick Wayne Krantz. Features three longest lasting bandmates- Keith Carlock, Tim Lefebvre, Nate Wood.
Known globally for his uncompromising musical vision, staggering virtuosity and deep reserves of soul, Wayne Krantz is one of very few modern guitarists to venture beyond the instrument’s limitations and create an identifiably original style and sound. Good Piranha/Bad Piranha is his full-throttle double-take on four contemporary pop and hip-hop songs, from which he plunders the textural, rhythmic and harmonic intrigue that has come to define each of his unique projects.
GPBP_CDCoverFollowing 2012′s critically acclaimed Howie 61—a record packed with cleverly arranged, hard-hitting original songs and a small army of masterful sidemen—Krantz has scaled back the setting and material for his tenth outing as a leader. Good Piranha/Bad Piranha finds his trio in the studio revisiting a selection of cover tunes they performed during legendary recent appearances at the 55 Bar in Greenwich Village.
Presenting two distinct versions each of Pendulum’s “Comprachicos,” M.C. Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This,” Ice Cube’s “My Skin is My Sin” and Radiohead vocalist Thom Yorke’s “Black Swan,” Krantz extracts and serves up a surprising range of nuance by switching up musicians and applying his inimitable instrumental inventiveness. Each song’s multiple takes allow the group(s) to reimagine the material from unexpected angles, making use of subtle rhythmic and melodic shifts to frame a dazzling display of the guitarist’s revered melodic and chordal innovations; he intertwines his stark, elastic tones with the familiar tunes’ snaky rhythmic skeletons and insistent basslines to create wholly new works.
Joining Krantz on Good Piranha/Bad Piranha are his longtime trio mates Keith Carlock (Steely Dan, Sting) on drums and Tim Lefebvre (Tedeschi Trucks Band) on bass. Recent cohort Nate Wood (Kneebody) reprises his chameleonic role in Krantz’ touring band, appearing here on bass for the first versions of the four tunes and then on drums for the second. The material is delicately enhanced by occasional vocal interjections courtesy Gabriela Anders.
Since the late ’80s Wayne Krantz has been revered as one of the world’s great guitarists, working alongside such rock legends as Steely Dan (both as a bandmember and later on solo projects by Donald Fagen), jazz saxophonists Michael Brecker, Chris Potter and David Binney, composer Carla Bley and drum icon Billy Cobham. In addition to his influential studio albums as a leader, Krantz has released several recordings of his celebrated live trio performances, which have become major concert draws worldwide for fans of powerfully adventurous improvised music.
- See more at: http://label.abstractlogix.com/?p=1387#sthash.Qm2Lp03R.dpuf

Russ Johnson - Still Out to Lunch! (2014)


The recording Out To Lunch, 43 minutes of music composed and brilliantly realized by multi-instrumentalist Eric Dolphy (1928 – 1964) with an extraordinarily well-attuned, one-time-only all-star ensemble, is a masterpiece, late 20th Century jazz every listener serious about music -- or just after a mind-opening experience -- should hear.

And as trumpeter Russ Johnson with his superb collaborators prove on Still Out To Lunch, it's the rare work of inspired collective improvisation that rewards revival. Johnson, alto saxophonist Roy Nathanson, pianist Myra Melford, bassist Brad Jones and drummer George Schuller here approach a 50-year-old classic with reverence but also regard for an imperative Dolphy would have undoubtedly endorsed -- that if they choose to play his music they should be themselves. The players here are not Dolphy, Freddie Hubbard, Bobby Hutcherson, Richard Davis and Tony Williams, nor should they be. One great value of Still Out To Lunch beyond the music's surface pleasures is that Johnson and company redeem the promise of the best repertory effort. More than revive art from the past, they make Dolphy's music live as their own.

"I've owned and loved the album for 20 years," Johnson explained before debuting this project with this personnel in a concert at Merkin Concert Hall in New York City in 2008. "I've listened to it hundreds of times, and Freddie Hubbard's solos, for instance, are fantastic. But my personal goal is to get away from his interpretation, and I don't want the other musicians to be affected by the recorded solos, either. I want all of us to make music that's true to Dolphy's vision, but which hasn't already been heard."

The way Johnson does that, with Nathanson playing alto and soprano sax (rather than alto, bass clarinet and flute as Dolphy did), Melford playing piano (rather than vibes, Hutcherson's instrument), Brad Jones on upright bass and George Schuller drumming, serves to complement and expand a program thousands of listeners already know and love. Still Out To Lunch comprises all five songs included on the original Blue Note LP, plus two never-before-recorded Dolphy pieces and a through-composed work by Gunther Schuller, Dolphy's mentor and sponsor at the heart of jazz's Third Stream movement (as well as drummer George Schuller's father).

As in Out To Lunch, the players on Still Out To Lunch balance far-reaching exploration and strict formality, individualized voices and ensemble interplay. Doing so, they arrive at wondrous imagery, as concrete as a portrait of Thelonious Monk (subject of "Hat and Beard"), as lyrical as an art song ("Something Sweet, Something Tender"). The musicians bring engagement and imagination to their investigations of Dolphy's finely tuned scores, resulting in deep moods, evoking true feelings.

So while "Hat and Beard" still starts with a whomp! and a sturdy walking bass, as soon as Melford makes her percussive entrance on piano we get a whole new perspective on Monk, grand master of keyboard mavericks – and Nathanson brings his trademark beseeching quality to the sax break that Dolphy sketched like a cubist following an action figure. Johnson opens "Something Sweet, Something Tender" with more growl and reflection than Hubbard favored while Jones bows cello-like, and when everyone enters they end the theme a melancholy akin to the blues. George Schuller sets up the title track as a slightly askew march that takes a sharp left when Johnson steps forward and Melford opens chords under him; Jones' solo holds the bass line despite taking the utmost freedoms with it, and Schuller abstracts the beat simply and swingingly.

Previously unrecorded, "Intake" is the first part of an unfinished multi-movement Love Suite Dolphy had written for woodwind quintet (flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and bass clarinet, which he would have played), piano, bass and drums. As Johnson lays into its beguiling, hopeful line, "Intake" seems out of the same folder that held "Something Sweet, Something Tender." "Gazzelloni," which Dolphy dedicated to the great Italian flutist of that name, here includes a brief combo dustup and another bass breakdown by Brad Jones.

"Little Blue Devil" was initially the third movement of composer Gunther Schuller's Seven Studies on Themes by Paul Klee, meant to (as Gunther has said) "stylize certain jazz elements and phrasing, relating them to the more advanced techniques of contemporary classical music." This rendition includes improv to fine effect: the elder Schuller's saucy strains are captured by Johnson and Nathanson in a call-and-response duet. Their deliberately nuanced dynamic and harmonic blend towards the end would have left classical virtuosi in the '60s wondering, "How do these jazzers do that?"


Similarly, "Straight Up and Down" is a miracle of empathic interaction. Johnson is shadowed by Melford, then they change places, then they flow in parallel, together. Gradually, Nathanson, Jones and George Schuller join them for a kick of a conclusion and slow fade. "Song for the Ram's Horn," a second Dolphy rarity, was transcribed from an obscure recording of his quintet featuring Herbie Hancock at Town Hall (NYC) in 1962. Johnson points the melody towards the Middle East, and Nathanson on soprano sax follows the same path, leading to Jones' noble arco statement.

"I had never done a tribute project," Russ Johnson says, "but jumped at the chance to do this one when Greg Evans [then Merkin's curator of music] suggested it. Putting together the band, I figured it would be a one-off, but I've been surprised – we continue to perform this material, several times a year."

And the band has worked itself into intimate knowledge of Dolphy's book. Johnson, Nathanson, Melford, Jones and Schuller are all busy as leaders, soloists or much-in-demand supportive talents, educators and clinicians. But there's something about the sensibility Dolphy conjured up for Out To Lunch and other works from its period that binds them together. It is the same immutable aura that has drawn attentive ears, generation after generation, to the creative genius of a gentle, dedicated winds and reedman who died while in Europe of undiagnosed diabetes at age 36, having made his mark in league with John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Ornette Coleman and yes, Gunther Schuller.

Dolphy's music bridges genres, looks to both the natural world and advanced music theory and taps the inner senses of those who come upon it. In this, his best-realized project, Dolphy encouraged us to leave the mundane, try the new, dare to be transformed and even court transcendence. It must be hugely satisfying to play – as it is to hear -- these pieces, to wrestle with their odd twists and probe their intricacies for what they unlock in ourselves. We have Eric Dolphy to thank for creating this work and his troupe of 1964 for realizing it brilliantly. Now we thank Russ Johnson and band for reminding us that really magical mysteries remain potent forever and that new visionaries can always refresh the once and future avant-garde. The music they've made is sometimes weird, wholly unpredictable, familiar but different. It's Still Out To Lunch.


Russ Johnson -trumpet
Roy Nathanson - alto + soprano sax
Myra Melford - piano
Brad Jones - bass
George Schuller - drums

1. Hat and Beard
2. Something Sweet, Something Tender
3. Out to Lunch
4. Intake
5. Gazzeloni
6. Little Blue Devil
7. Straight Up and Down
8. Song for the Ram's Horn

Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi