jueves, 25 de septiembre de 2014

CHINGARI - BOMBAY MAKOSSA (2014)


Source & Label: Abstractlogix


Each a giant in their respective spheres, the three members of Chingari have joined forces to explore an unprecedented synthesis of international traditions on their debut album Bombay Makossa. Available September 16, 2014, on Abstract Logix, Bombay Makossa fuses the rhythmic intricacy and improvisational fervor of South Indian Carnatic music with the infectious buoyancy of Cameroonian sounds, bridged by a shared love of jazz, second-line funk, and the shimmering textures and grooves of modern pop. Only three master musicians could make such an audacious hybrid sound as fluid and organic as Bombay Makossa, and they are the members of Chingari.
 
U. Shrinivas (electric mandolin): A legendary figure renowned for adapting the mandolin to the demanding rigors of traditional South Indian music, Shrinivas’s playing has won international acclaim for its ecstatic, almost vocal quality. George Harrison and Miles Davis numbered among his fans, and he dazzled audiences around the world as a member of Remember Shakti, alongside guitarist John McLaughlin and Ustad Zakir Hussain.

Etienne Mbappe (bass, vocals): His gift for tackling the most demanding and complex rhythmic structures with ease and fluency won Cameroon-born and Paris-based Mbappe membership in the bands of Salif Keita, Joe Zawinul and Manu Dibango early in his career. He currently performs with John McLaughlin’s kaleidoscopic 4th Dimension quartet and in the all-star fusion group the Ringers with Jimmy Herring and Wayne Krantz.

Ranjit Barot (drums, vocals): A dynamic, multifaceted musician and composer, Barot has excelled in a number of contexts, from composing film scores for Bollywood to playing drums with such iconic musicians as Don Cherry and John McLaughlin. He is also a master of konnakol (the Carnatic tradition of spoken percussion syllables) and can be heard as a member of John McLaughlin’s 4th Dimension.

Together Shrinivas, Etienne Mbappe, and Barot are Chingari. With Bombay Makossa, they chart a daring path informed by their rich individual experience and accomplishments while reveling in the endless potential of a new musical hybrid that is entirely their own.



01. Pack Up Your Bags
02. Sona Inon
03. Fireflight
04. Longue Lami
05. Tempest
06. Third World
07. Bombay Makossa


01. Pack Up Your Bags
02. Sona Inon
03. Fireflight
04. Longue Lami
05. Tempest
06. Third World
07. Bombay Makossa - See more at: http://label.abstractlogix.com/?p=1356#sthash.3kxXMMbQ.dpuf
U.Shrinivas (Mandolin)
Etienne Mbappe (Bass and Vocals)
Ranjit Barot (Drums, Konokol. Vocals) 


"The most important thing I look for in a musician,
 is whether he knows how to listen."
  - Duke Ellington - 



GAB

Each a giant in their respective spheres, the three members of Chingari have joined forces to explore an unprecedented synthesis of international traditions on their debut album Bombay Makossa. Available September 16, 2014, on Abstract Logix, Bombay Makossa fuses the rhythmic intricacy and improvisational fervor of South Indian Carnatic music with the infectious buoyancy of Cameroonian sounds, bridged by a shared love of jazz, second-line funk, and the shimmering textures and grooves of modern pop.
Only three master musicians could make such an audacious hybrid sound as fluid and organic as Bombay Makossa, and they are the members of Chingari.
OzNoy2_CDCover
U. Shrinivas (electric mandolin): A legendary figure renowned for adapting the mandolin to the demanding rigors of traditional South Indian music, Shrinivas’s playing has won international acclaim for its ecstatic, almost vocal quality. George Harrison and Miles Davis numbered among his fans, and he dazzled audiences around the world as a member of Remember Shakti, alongside guitarist John McLaughlin and Ustad Zakir Hussain.
Etienne Mbappe (bass, vocals): His gift for tackling the most demanding and complex rhythmic structures with ease and fluency won Cameroon-born and Paris-based Mbappe membership in the bands of Salif Keita, Joe Zawinul and Manu Dibango early in his career. He currently performs with John McLaughlin’s kaleidoscopic 4th Dimension quartet and in the all-star fusion group the Ringers with Jimmy Herring and Wayne Krantz.
Ranjit Barot (drums, vocals): A dynamic, multifaceted musician and composer, Barot has excelled in a number of contexts, from composing film scores for Bollywood to playing drums with such iconic musicians as Don Cherry and John McLaughlin. He is also a master of konnakol (the Carnatic tradition of spoken percussion syllables) and can be heard as a member of John McLaughlin’s 4th Dimension.
Together Shrinivas, Etienne Mbappe, and Barot are Chingari. With Bombay Makossa, they chart a daring path informed by their rich individual experience and accomplishments while reveling in the endless potential of a new musical hybrid that is entirely their own.
- See more at: http://label.abstractlogix.com/?p=1356#sthash.3kxXMMbQ.dpuf

Jeff Lederer's - Swing n' Dix (2013)




Depending on your distance from fifth-grade humor, the wordplay in the name of Jeff Lederer’s latest band is worthy of either a snicker or a cringe. But it also happens to be accurate: Swing n’ Dix is an irreverent but good-natured group that takes its cues from the gusto of swing and Dixieland music. Lederer is a potent reedman best known for his membership in drummer Matt Wilson’s quartet, and he recruits Wilson and cornet player Kirk Knuffke from that ensemble for this project. He scores a coup by rounding out the band with Bob Stewart, who at age 68 still huffs and puffs a tuba with distinctively resonant aplomb. Stewart’s jaunty presence on the tonal bottom line simultaneously adds fun and legitimacy to the proceedings.

Wilson has long been a genre-smudging master of madcap ingenuity—crisp, goofy and magnetic in all the right places. His splash-cymbal patter beside Stewart’s tuba splats, mixed with the tootling of Lederer (on clarinet) and Knuffke, capture the giddy charm of Fats Waller’s Prohibition-era ditty “Honeysuckle Rose.” The quartet covers Pee Wee Russell on a slow blues workout, invites Mary LaRose to sing the Shaker hymn “My Sweet Home in Zion” and nods to bop with Duke Pearson’s “ESP (Extrasensory Perception).” Their rendition of “La Rosita” (perhaps best known via Coleman Hawkins and Ben Webster) has the loose, gangly ambiance of a Henry Threadgill number. The closing title track, a Lederer original, sounds like a soundtrack for a clown-car skit even before the group vocals kick in. Throughout the album, the attitude is one of lighthearted novelty. But the caliber and command of the ensemble interplay rarely fail to remind you of the depth of the band’s collective talent.


Jeff Lederer: tenor & alto sax, clarinet, vocals
Kirk Knuffke: cornet, vocals
Bob Stewart: tuba, vocals
Matt Wilson: drums, vocals
Mary LaRose: vocals, track 8

01. Honeysuckle Rose
02. Silver Spade
03. Ride
04. Nibble
05. I'll Take a Dozen
06. Pee Wee's Blues
07. E.S.P.
08. My Sweet Home in Zion
09. La Rosita
10. Two Jeffs
11. Swing n' Dix

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

Branford Marsalis Quartet - Metamorphosen (2009)

Cover (Custom)

TRACKLIST:
01. The Return of the Jitney Man (Watts) 5:57 
02. The Blossom of Parting (Calderazzo) 8:53 
03. Jabberwocky (Marsalis) 5:16 
04. Abe Vigoda (Revis) 5:22 
05. Rhythm-A-Ning (Monk) 8:04 
06. Sphere (Revis) 6:15 
07. The Last Goodbye (Calderazzo) 8:29 
08. And Then, He Was Gone (Revis) 3:17 
09. Samo (Watts) 10:01


Line Up:
Branford Marsalis (soprano,tenor and alto saxes)
Joey Calderazzo (piano)
Eric Revis (bass)
Jeff "Tain" Watts (drums)



 Time flies when you are making great music, as Branford Marsalis will be the first to attest. "I had no idea that two years had passed since we made our last album," says the celebrated saxophonist, composer, producer and leader of the Branford Marsalis Quartet. 
The realization prompted a simple charge to Quartet members Joey Calderazzo, Eric Revis and Jeff "Tain"Watts. "At the end of our European tour this summer, I just told the guys, `We're going into the studio next month.'' The results of that visit to Durham, North Carolina's Hayti Heritage Center, 

Metamorphosen, is another milestone from an ensemble that continues to set the pace regarding jazz creativity. Marsalis Music will release the latest statement by its founder in March 2009. Marsalis chose the title, which is German for "metamorphoses," to emphasize the evolution of both his venerable ensemble (now in its second decade with identical personnel) and each individual member. "We've all been practicing," he emphasizes, "and you can hear it in the development of the music and in our sound. 

The more that each of us practices, the more our individual sounds become centered. Now, while we are all in the same room, it sounds as if each of the instruments were isolated. That's what practice will do for you." Engineer Rob Hunter agrees that the Quartet's sound is "just as intense as before, but different. What comes out is very clean, and I attribute that to how well the guys are playing." Another key element is the ever-widening scope of the band's repertoire. "We try to do everything," Marsalis explains. "We run the gamut, and are prepared to play anything at any time, including songs we don't know. 

The guys have to be listening to all kinds of music, but these are incredible musicians who are really good at playing in a variety of styles." Each member of the Quartet confirms the importance of this approach. "My other sideman experiences let me get better at the stuff I was already good at, but the other stuff never got addressed," says pianist Calderazzo. "In this band, I've had to deal with everything. It's been like getting a gig with Betty Carter or Art Blakey at an older age. I have more options, and I've gotten better." The proof is in Calderazzo's inspired playing throughout, and in his two beautiful compositions, 

"The Blossom of Parting" and "The Last Goodbye." For bassist Revis, personal and ensemble growth are inseparable. "Branford and the band have allowed me to realize my own voice. As you become more comfortable, personal barriers start breaking down. I've always tried to grow, but now I do it with a purpose -and we're all like that. You can develop a lot more at home, and this is home." Revis' growth is most obvious in his three contributions to the program: the loping "Sphere" ("a specific idea that, once developed, sounded Monkish"), cryptic "Abe Vigoda" and unaccompanied bass feature "And Then, He was Gone," written to mark his son's maturity and "leaving the nest.

" Drummer Watts, who has been playing with Marsalis since they were classmates at Berklee College, speaks of how "The band is trying to turn the corner.We can already come from five or six formats strongly; but from this recording on I feel like there will be even more personal avenues. The band is not changing through a consolidated effort, because that probably wouldn't work. It's more about individuals picking up their game, and each of us picking up on that. Everyone is also bringing in more music, which also flips a switch. While this is definitely Branford's group, I feel like it's my group, too, and I welcome every opportunity to make a statement with it.

" This time out,Watts contributes "The Return of the Jitney Man" ("It's about my father, who did a lot of construction work but also drove a jitney when the holidays approached, and trying to get closer to his work ethic.") and "Samo ©," a phrase intended for a larger work that took on a life of its own and is dedicated to the late visual artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Completing the program is the Quartet's take on Thelonious Monk's "Rhythm-a-ning" and Marsalis' own "Jabberwocky," a treacherous 19-bar form that features his first recording on alto saxophone in over two decades. "I realized that I was the only person who didn't have a song to bring to the session," he recalls. 

"Then I went on a holiday with my family and began to hear `Jabberwocky' in my head. All I had with me was an alto saxophone, and I thought that I'd transcribe it for soprano or tenor when I got home. But it didn't sound as good on either of those horns, so for that track I'm back on alto." "The band is the theme," Marsalis offers in summing up Metamorphosen. "We just picked songs that are good, and you can't play the stuff we're playing unless you're in a working band.We stay together because we all want to be here. A lot of people prefer to play it safe, touring in `super bands,' being responsible only for themselves. When you have a band, you get defined in comparison to other great bands. And that's why I play jazz. I want to be defined by a body of work. "My father likes to call recordings `documents,'" Marsalis concludes, "and I know what he means. They document how good you are, or how good you aren't." Metamorphosen documents one of the preeminent ensembles in contemporary music, getting even better.


RAZ

Matt Brewer - Mythology (2014)


A leading bassist of his generation, Matt Brewer has distinguished himself in groups led by Greg Osby, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Vijay Iyer, John Escreet and many others. His Criss Cross appearances on Mike Moreno's First In Mind and David Binney's Anacapa have also left a lasting impression.

On Mythology, his debut as a leader, the Oklahoma City-born, Albuquerque, New Mexico-raised Brewer leads a sextet with some of the fiercest individualists on the jazz scene today: alto saxist Steve Lehman and tenorist Mark Turner in the frontline; guitarist Lage Lund and pianist David Virelles as ensemble voices and featured soloists as well; drummer Marcus Gilmore bringing a flexible, swinging, highly structured rhythmic vocabulary to the table.

With his mostly original pieces Brewer reveals an adventurous, lyrical bent as a composer. The band's uptempo reading of Ornette Coleman's "Free" truly catches fire as well.


Matt Brewer (B)
Mark Turner (Ts)
Steve Lehman (As)
Lage Lund (G)
David Virelles (P)
Marcus Gilmore (D)

1. Abiquiú (Matt Brewer)
2. Rose Hill (Matt Brewer)
3. Fighting Windmills (Matt Brewer)
4. Joya (Matt Brewer)
5. Moorings (Matt Brewer)
6. Free (Ornette Coleman)
7. Sun Symbol (Matt Brewer)
8. Mythology (Matt Brewer)

Recorded February 4, 2014 in Brooklyn, NY, USA by Michael Marciano

"Hearing is Everything" Peter Watkins


Domi

Chico Freeman - The Piep Piper (1984)

Front (Custom)

TRACKLIST:
A1.The Pied Piper  6:47
A2.The Rose Tattoo  6:23
A3.Blues On The Bottom  5:49
B1.Monk 2000              7:08
B2.Softly As In A Morning Sunrise   8:05
B3.Amor So?a Dor                 8:32


LINEUP:
John Purcell. Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Oboe, Flute [Alto], Piccolo Flute
Cecil McBee. Bass
Elvin Jones.Drums
Kenny Kirkland Piano. (tracks: A2, A3, B2, B3), Mark Thompson (9) (tracks: A1, B1)
Chico Freeman.Tenor Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Sopranino Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, Bass Clarinet, Flute [Bass, C Flute]

Recorded: April 9, 1984 at Eurosound Studios, New York.
Producer: Chico Freeman, Herb Wong

Review:
A surprisingly great little set from Chico Freeman -- and a record that seems to hone his best creative energies of the loft jazz years into an even hipper groove! The group here features Freeman on a wide variety of reeds -- alongside John Purcell on saxes and oboe, Kenny Kirkland on piano, Cecil McBee on bass, and Elvin Jones on drums -- all in a sound that's wonderfully focused, and in a way that almost has Chico sounding a lot more deeply expressive than in earlier years. To us, Freeman's always been one of those players who sounds better on the inside than the out -- and this album has him nicely restrained, and really working on the best side of his craft. This colorful album is worth searching for.


RAZ